How to Get a New Auto Title

how to get a new auto title

When you own a car, you receive an important document. This document is an auto title, and it’s something that people typically tell you not to lose or damage. Otherwise, it could cause trouble. 

Usually, you safeguard this piece of information the best way that you can, hoping nothing happens to it. But what do you do when the worst-case scenario occurs, and you lose or damage your auto title? 

If you’ve found yourself in this predicament, it’s easy to panic and wonder what to do next. However, if you want to learn how to get a new auto title, this article will provide one easy tip that you can use. 

What is an auto title?

Before learning how to get a new auto title, it’s essential to revisit the purpose of having this document. This information might be old news to some of you, in which case this will be a good refresher. But if you’ve never learned what an auto title is, this definition will explain why it’s so critical to safeguard this document. 

Put simply, an auto title proves that you own your motor vehicle. Without it, you have no way of showing that you possess ownership of your car. 

Depending on the state you live in, the information on the auto title will vary. However, it’ll always include a vehicle identification number (VIN) and the signature of state officials who are in charge of motor vehicles or revenue collection. 

Typically, an auto title will also include the following:

  • Vehicle make
  • Vehicle model or body type
  • Vehicle year 
  • The owners of the vehicle 
  • The owner’s address
  • Odometer reading 
  • The date the title was issued 

Sometimes, your auto title may have more specific information. Yours could provide your license plate number, your vehicle’s weight, a title number, the engine number, the number of cylinders in the engine, and the type of fuel your vehicle uses. Additionally, some states require that you add information about salvage or flood damage. 

Why is a car title important? 

why is a new auto title important

You want a car title because it’ll prove that you own your vehicle—that’s the primary benefit of the document. But there are practical ways where you’ll see this benefit play out. For example, an auto title is important in the following situations.

1. Someone steals your car

If someone steals your motor vehicle, how do you prove that the thief doesn’t own your car? You refer to your auto title. Without this document, the police won’t believe that you possess ownership of your vehicle. 

2. You want to sell your car

You can’t sell your vehicle without an auto title. The buyer will ask you to transfer the title to them to prove they’re the new owners. But if you don’t have your auto title, the buyer is going to walk away

3. Your car gets impounded 

No one likes to hear that their car is in an impoundment lot. In these situations, it’s crucial to have your auto title. If you don’t, your vehicle will sit in the lot until it gets recycled, auctioned off, or taken to the wrecking yard. The only way to prevent any of these things from happening is to have proof that you own your vehicle when you pick it up. 

4. A vehicle is part of a crime after you sell it or before you own it 

It doesn’t matter if a vehicle is part of a crime after you sell it or before you own it. When the authorities come to speak with you, you want to have proof that you didn’t own the vehicle when it was part of a crime. Otherwise, you could draw unwanted attention. 

Types of auto titles

So, you know what an auto title is and why it’s important. But do you know what type of new auto title you need? 

Surprisingly, there are multiple types of auto titles. And before you try to get a new one, you need to know exactly what you’re replacing. Luckily, the list of auto titles is pretty short. 

1. An auto title for a clean vehicle

You need this type of auto title if your vehicle is in good shape structurally. This title indicates that your car has never been in a major accident, and therefore, totaled.  

2. An auto title for a clear vehicle

This title is required if there are no liens against your vehicle. If you’re not making any finance payments because you own your car, you want this type of title. 

3. An auto title for a salvage vehicle 

You need this auto title if your car was in an accident and declared a total loss. With a salvage title, the state is basically saying that you can’t drive or sell your vehicle in its current condition. 

4. An auto title for a rebuilt vehicle 

If you get your salvaged vehicle repaired, you need an auto title that’s specific to your rebuilt car. This title indicates that your vehicle is in better shape or that it may require additional repairs in the future.  

How to get a new auto title

It’s finally time to explain how to get a new auto title. When you get your first one, you either get it from a car dealer or private owner, depending on where you bought your car. 

But when you lose or damage that auto title, you can’t go back to the previous owner or car dealer. Instead, must with the DMV or a transportation agency. 

As you probably know, the DMV is slow. You could walk into their waiting room and sit for hours until an employee finally assists you. If you want to avoid that pain, you should go through a transportation agency. 

For example, Barry Risk Management can help you get a new auto title. With over 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, their team knows how to get the appropriate type of title and make sure it meets all of your state’s requirements. 

The best part is that everything is also online. Instead of walking inside an office, you can simply contact an agent over the phone. Then, a representative will help you get a new auto title all online, in the comfort of your own home. 

With transportation agencies like Barry Risk Management, getting a new auto title is simple and quick. There are no tricks, waiting rooms, or long wait times. You can get your auto title quickly so that you have proof your car is yours.  

Call Barry Risk Management at 1-888-995-TAGS(8247) to renew get your new auto title! 

How Much Does It Cost to Renew Your Vehicle Registration?

the costs to renew your vehicle registration

In 2020, most state governments provided wiggle room regarding the deadline for renewing vehicle registration. With the pandemic disrupting many everyday activities, state officials thought it’d be best to extend the deadline for several DMV services, including vehicle registration renewals. 

Most states, like New York, extended the deadline all the way to November of 2020 to accommodate people. But today, those extensions no longer exist. In New York and other states across the U.S., your vehicle registration should be renewed at this point. However, that’s not the reality for many people. 

Whether you forgot about the extended deadline or thought state officials would extend it again, you’re in a situation where you haven’t renewed your vehicle registration. And this situation can lead to consequences, which is why you should get your registration renewed as soon as possible.

The consequences of not renewing your vehicle registration

When you don’t do something on time, you face the repercussions. For example, think about turning in a school assignment late. When that happens, you get an F unless your teacher is gracious enough to extend the deadline. 

If the teacher gives you extra time, you’re in luck—you can turn in the assignment by the new deadline and still get credit. However, if you still forget—or ignore—the extended deadline and don’t turn in the assignment on time, you can bet you’re going to face the consequences. 

About 430,000 Massachusetts residents are in this type of situation. Instead of renewing their vehicle registration by the extended deadline, they let their registration lapse. And now, they are in jeopardy of getting fined every time they drive their motor vehicle. 

What’s even worse is that there are 580,000 motor vehicles in the state with an expired inspection sticker, and those vehicles belong to the 430,000 residents, who will get fined multiple times if they have more than one vehicle with expired registration. If an officer pulls them over, they’ll likely receive a $40 fine, but the residents can get a penalty from multiple officers in one day, so that number can always increase. 

The worst punishment, however, is when the fines lead to higher car insurance rates. If an insurer notices that a driver is accumulating fines, the company won’t hesitate to increase its price. 

Consequences like these are common across every state, not just Massachusetts. State officials everywhere are fining residents who haven’t renewed their vehicle registration by the extended deadline. It doesn’t matter where you live. If your registration isn’t up-to-date, you’re at risk of receiving a fine and more expensive car insurance.  

The costs to renew your vehicle registration 

how much it costs to renew your vehicle registration?

If you want to renew your registration, you may be wondering how much it costs. Luckily, this service doesn’t demand a hefty price, but it does differ from state to state. 

In New York, for example, renewing your vehicle registration can be anywhere from $26 – $71, depending on the weight of your vehicle. If your motor vehicle is 1,650 lbs. or less, the registration renewal will cost $26. If it’s 1,751 lbs. to 1,850 lbs., the registration renewal will cost $29. And if it’s 1,951 lbs. or more, the registration renewal will be anywhere between $32.50 to $71.  

In Connecticut, on the other hand, the cost is different. If you live in this state and want to renew your vehicle registration, the price is around $80 for two years. However, you also have to pay an extra $10 for the Clean Air Act fee.  

Ultimately, the price for registration renewal depends on where you live and what your state uses to determine the costs. Common factors that play a role in determining the fee include your vehicle’s fuel efficiency, age, current value, and weight. But sometimes, DMV offices and transportation agencies also look at the number of cars registered in your name and your vehicle’s horsepower to see if your fee should be higher or lower.  

Where you shouldn’t go to renew vehicle registration

Once you know the cost of renewing your vehicle registration, it’s time to do it. But where should you go? The first answer is the most obvious one: the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). 

This option is usually the go-to route because it’s so well known. However, that doesn’t mean it should be the most popular. The DMV is notoriously slow, and the pandemic makes that fact even more true. 

DMV offices across the U.S. are struggling to address the backlog they’ve accumulated because of COVID-19. When their offices re-opened during the pandemic, DMV employees walked in to find more people than usual needing their help. 

The situation has gotten so bad that some people are waiting up to six months to complete simple transitions like license renewals, driver’s tests, and out-of-state transfers. And while vehicle registration is something that you can handle online, the DMV’s website is not as user-friendly as it should be to ensure a quick, seamless process. 

Where to renew your vehicle registration

If you want to renew your vehicle registration quickly to avoid fines and higher insurance rates, you can’t depend on the DMV. Instead, you need to use a credible transportation agency like Barry Risk Management, Inc. 

With over 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, Barry Risk Management, Inc. has the skills to help you renew your vehicle registration, and everything happens online. Unlike the DMV, the online platform that Barry Risk Management, Inc. uses is simple and user-friendly to ensure you get your renewal done quickly. 

And if any questions ever arise as you’re renewing your registration, Barry Risk Management, Inc. has representatives that are ready to help. Knowledgeable and friendly, a representative can guide you from start-to-finish until your renewed registration is set up, so you don’t have to worry about tackling any confusing phases alone. 

Don’t get a fine for not renewing your vehicle registration. Call to have Barry Risk Management, Inc. at 1-888-995-TAGS(8247) to renew your registration quickly! 

How to Get Personalized License Plates Online

find out how to get personalized license plates with All State Tags

When you get a new vehicle, you probably like to personalize it. You like to pick a sleek color for the exterior, select a nice color for the interior, and choose rims or tires that give your car an extra oomph. 

Some people may not bother with all of this hassle—they may not personalize every detail of their vehicle because the design isn’t the most important thing to them. Perhaps they care more about safety. It’s equally important to have a car that can go from point A to B. 

However, if you’re someone who cares about personalizing every aspect of your vehicle, then you need more than just a safe car. You need something that’s tailored specifically to you. 

Whether it’s a car, truck, or motorcycle, custom vehicles are essential to you. They act as an extension of your identity, and they give people a glimpse into who you are and what you like. That’s why you put so much energy into personalizing your vehicle and maybe even your license plates. 

Custom license plates can say a lot about you. They can reveal your interest, hobbies, favorite sports team, alma mater, and whether or not you’re active military or a veteran. But getting these plates is not always easy, especially when you go through the DMV. That’s why you need to learn how to get personalized license plates online. 

What to know about personalized license plates

Before you learn how to get personalized license plates online, you need to know something else first: custom plates can backfire from time to time. These pitfalls usually don’t occur if your personalized plates simply include a picture next to your license plate number. 

For example, maybe you want to include your favorite team’s mascot or your college logo on your license plates. In this scenario, you’ll rarely face issues with personalizing your plates.

However, when you go beyond choosing an image and try to select the numbers and letters on your new license plates, problems can sometimes occur. It’s not uncommon to see people who’ve chosen a combination of letters and numbers for their license plates and unintentionally and surprisingly faced hurdles. 

In fact, here are just a handful of stories that illustrate what can happen when you try to personalize your new license plates. 

Learn how to get personalized license plates for your motor vehicle.

1. License plates that say NOTAG

Multiple drivers have experienced the consequences of having NOTAG on their license plates. In 2004, a man with a Suzuki motorcycle received more than 200 citations because of Delaware’s computer system. According to the Associated Press, the system linked any ticket regarding a lack of plates to the man’s personal information. 

A similar incident also happened to a woman in 2012. While living in Florida, she found herself with 145 tickets that cost more than $8,000. And it was all because her personalized license plates had NOTAG on them. 

2. License plates that say NO TAGS

In Washington DC, a man had slightly different license plates than the one in the above example. Instead of NOTAG, his license plates read NO TAGS. And, of course, this variation also led to issues. 

The man kept his license plates for nearly 30 years, and during that time, he got more than $20,000 in tickets. He told an NBC affiliate that he had to visit the courthouse every few months to get the tickets removed. 

But eventually, city officials spoke to authorities to resolve the issue. Moving forward, ticket writers had to write down “none” instead of “no tags” if they came across a vehicle without license plates. 

3. License plates that say NONE

The next example comes from Los Angeles in 1979. According to LA Times, the state allowed people to write down their top three choices for a custom license plate. 

A sportsman who loved the ocean wrote BOATING and SAILING as his top two choices. Then, in the third slot, he jotted down NO PLATE, assuming the DMV would realize he wanted a standard license plate if his top two choices didn’t work. However, the DMV never made this realization. 

The characters on his license plate read NO PLATE. And after seven months, he had 2,500 citations. The LA Times reported that the DMV had to inform the authorities to stop writing “no plate” on tickets and start saying “none.”

4. License plates that say NV

In 2004, a man in California decided to use NV on his new license plates—these characters were his initials, and for a while, things were great. He didn’t run into any issues. 

But one day, he discovered something interesting. In California, NV stands for “not visible” to traffic cops. And it wasn’t long before the man started to get tickets, which he handled one-by-one. However, when something happened with Oakland’s computer system, the man started to receive tickets across different counties, totaling more than $3,000. 

Choose your new custom license plates carefully 

The list above offers just a handful of examples to showcase how tricky it can be when you get personalized license plates. But those examples shouldn’t scare you off. 

You can still personalize your plates, regardless of whether you want an image or your own sequence of letters and numbers. Just keep in mind that if you choose the ladder, select a combination of characters wisely. You don’t want to find yourself in a situation where you’re getting tickets on a regular basis for no fault of your own. 

Your state will try to do what it can to help you out—city officials are not required to approve your request for personalized license plates. So if your state notices that your combination of letters and numbers is problematic, they will reject it. 

But states are not going to catch every potential blunder. If you want to prevent any problems, you need to make sure the letters and numbers you’re picking won’t lead to any obstacles. 

Get personalized license plates online  

Once you figure out what you’re going to put on your personalized license plates, you have two options to get it done. You can either go through the DMV. The organization allows you to come in person, mail in a form, or use their website to get personalized plates. 

Or, you can have a transportation agency like Barry Risk Management, Inc. handle everything for you. Unlike the DMV, Barry Risk Management, Inc. makes things easy. Everything is online. Their processes are convenient, simple, and easy to go through. And there are representatives that are waiting to help you if questions arise.

With over 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, Barry Risk Management, Inc. knows how to get you new personalized license plates. It doesn’t matter what state you’re in or what the rules are. If you want custom license plates, Barry Risk Management, Inc. can help you quicker than the DMV. 

For help getting new license plates that are personalized to your tastes, call 1-888-995-TAGS(8247) to speak with a representative!

What Do You Need to Register a Vehicle?

what do you need to register a vehicle? Discover the answers in our blog post.

If you want something, usually you have to give something in return.

For example, if you want to pursue a side hustle, you need to put in the effort. If you want to park at a meter, you need to give it money. And if you want good relationships, you have to spend time with the people who matter most. 

When it comes to certain things in life, sometimes you just don’t have a choice — you have to give in order to get. And the same concept applies to registering a vehicle. 

While a mundane task, you have to provide several things for vehicle registration. It doesn’t matter if it’s a motorcycle, motor home, SUV, or two-door car. If you’re riding around in something with wheels, you need to register it, and you need to provide the right information to do so correctly. 

Surprisingly, though, most people don’t know what to bring. While many consumers have at least one vehicle, they don’t know what information they need to provide to register it. In fact, even if someone has registered a car before, it’s likely they’ve already forgotten what they had to bring to do it. 

And that’s no one’s fault. Vehicle registration just isn’t top-of-mind. People don’t think about it on a regular basis, so the details can get a little blurry. 

However, that’s why this article is here for you to read. If you’re wondering what you need to register a motor vehicle, you’ve come to the right place. 

When you need to register a vehicle 

It’s important to start with the basics. 

Before you learn what you need to register a vehicle, you should know whether you need to register it at all. There are certain times where you need to apply for vehicle registration. And depending on your situation, you may not have to do it that often. 

For example, here are three specific times when you’ll need to register your motor vehicle. 

1. When you move to a new state

Moving to a new state is expected. When you graduate from college, you might decide to move. When you get a job out of state, you usually have to move. And when you retire, you may want to move somewhere that has great weather, sunshine every day of the week, and a beach. 

Research suggests that if you’re living in the U.S., you can expect to move 11.7 times in your lifetime. That’s a lot of relocating. And while it’s easy to get swept up by the adventure in it all, you don’t want to get so excited that you forget to do one crucial thing: register your vehicle. 

That’s right—every time you move to a new state, you need to register your motor vehicle. And you need to do it within a specific timeframe. Every state is different, so the timeframes will vary. But as long as you check with your state’s requirements, you should be good to go. 

2. When you buy a new or used vehicle 

Getting a car, truck, or another type of motor vehicle is always exciting. Whether it’s new or used, it’s easy to fall in love with your new whip. However, before you grab the keys and take off without a second thought, you need to register your vehicle. 

If you get a vehicle from a dealership, the company will likely handle this task for you. Most dealerships will take care of the registration, regardless of whether the vehicle is new or used. 

But if you’re getting a vehicle from someone who doesn’t work for a dealership, then you’ll need to register the vehicle on your own. 

3. When you need to renew your registration

Maybe you’ve already registered your vehicle. If that’s the case, you’ll need to do it again. However, you won’t have to do it often. 

Most states require you to renew your vehicle registration every 1-2 years. But again, every state is different. If you want information that’s specific to you and your vehicle registration, you should look up your state’s requirements. Then, you’ll know exactly when it’s time to renew your registration. 

What you need for vehicle registration

After you buy a car, you need to register it. But what do you need to register a vehicle? Find out.

 

When it’s time for you to register your vehicle, you need to approach the task prepared. Doing this requires you to know everything that you need. And luckily, the list of items is simple. 

If you need to register your vehicle, most states will require the following: 

1. Money to pay the fees

As with most things that deal with your vehicle, you need to pay a registration fee to register it. The price will differ depending on the state you live in, so make sure you do some research to determine the exact costs. 

2. The car title

Before you can register a vehicle, you need to prove that it’s actually yours. Without proof of ownership, you can’t register any motor vehicle in your name, so make sure you have the car title with you. And if you’re leasing a motor vehicle, bring a copy of the lease agreement. 

3. Proof of ID and residence

Registering a vehicle with a state requires you to prove that you indeed live in the state. Typically, your license can work. It’ll prove your identity and residence. 

However, if you just moved to a new state, your license will not work. In this case, you need to find something else to bring, like a utility bill. 

4. A bill of sale or certificate of origin

Are you the first person to own your vehicle? If so, you need to provide the certificate of origin to prove it, which you’ll get from the car dealer. 

If you’re not the first person to own your vehicle, then you need to provide something else: the bill of sale. You should get this document from the private seller who sold you the vehicle. 

5. Information about the vehicle 

Most of the general information about your vehicle will be on the title. However, in case something’s missing, you want to be prepared. 

Before registering your vehicle, make sure you jot down important information, including your vehicle’s make, model, model year, color, odometer reading, and Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). 

6. Proof of insurance

Car insurance is essential. It protects you and helps you register your vehicle with the state. When you get car insurance, make sure to provide proof of it when you’re registering your vehicle. You should also ensure that your insurance follows state requirements because these guidelines can vary depending on where you live. 

7. Emission and safety certificates

If you have a used car, some states will want proof that your vehicle meets certain criteria. These specific guidelines are usually in regards to emissions and whether your vehicle is mechanically sound.

How to register your vehicle 

Once you have everything you need to register your vehicle, all you have to do is complete the task. You can do this in one of two ways. 

You can either go to the DMV or use a credible transportation agency like Barry Risk Management, Inc.. The ladder option is the best because good transportation agencies don’t require you to go through a long, arduous process like the DMV does. 

For example, Barry Risk Management, Inc. lets you register your vehicle online. And you get access to a representative who knows your state’s requirements for vehicle registration, allowing you to skip a lengthy research process. 

The best part is that Barry Risk Management, Inc. is just as skilled as any DMV office. Their team has 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, making them an excellent choice if you want DMV services without all of the hassles. 

So, if you want to register your vehicle, use Barry Risk Management, Inc. Then, you can check this task off your to-do list quickly and easily. 

Call  1-888-995-TAGS(8247) to contact a representative with Barry Risk Management, Inc. and register or renew your vehicle registration! 

What is the Difference Between Car Title and Registration?

What is the Difference Between Car Title and Registration?

When you’re in the market for a new car, you have a lot to think about. What kind of vehicle do you want? Do you need an auto loan? Are there any reasonable car insurance rates? Should you even buy, or should you just lease?

All of these questions can easily run through your mind, and you need to have an answer for all of them. However, if you decide to buy a vehicle, you have to get a car title and registration, which could lead to another pressing question: what’s the difference between them? 

It’s easy to mistake these documents as one and the same. But honestly, a car title is entirely different from vehicle registration. You can’t get one of these documents and assume it’ll act as a representative for the other. 

You need to get both of them, which means you need to understand the differences between a car title and vehicle registration. 

What is a car title? 

Also called a Certificate of Title, a car title shows proof of ownership for various motor vehicles, including a car, truck, motorboat, motorcycle, utility trailer, travel trailer, or mobile home. 

Without a car title, you can’t prove to anyone that you legally own your motor vehicle. It’s the only piece of paper standing between you and someone else possibly thinking that you stole your car. So, it’s really important to have. 

Once you get your car title, you may notice that it includes a few details. This document will provide information on your motor vehicle like its make, model, year, and whether someone has totaled it or deemed it a complete loss after a theft or accident. 

Another critical piece of information that you’ll notice is any lienholders that you used. If you borrowed money from an auto dealer or bank to purchase your vehicle, that entity is going to be on your car title. 

How do you get a car title? 

learn the difference between a car title and vehicle registration

So, you know how important it is to have a car title, but how do you actually get one. The answer to this question depends on the situation. Specifically, here are three different scenarios in which you will need to get a car title. 

1. Buying a used vehicle 

If you’re buying a used vehicle, you’ll need the current owner to transfer the title to you. How this transfer happens will depend on how old the vehicle is. 

For example, maybe you buy a vehicle with the model year of 1973 or newer. In this situation, you need the current owner to put your name on the transfer section of the car title. Depending on the state you live in, you may have to get the title notarized and have the original owner sign a vehicle bill of sale. 

For vehicles that are ten years old or newer than the year of transfer, you’ll follow the same process. However, you may also need to get a damage disclosure statement and an odometer disclosure statement signed. 

And for vehicles from 1973 or later, all you have to do is have the owner sign the transferable registration and a bill of sale.  

2. Paying off your auto loan

When you’ve finished paying off your auto loan, it can feel like a relief. It’s one less bill that you have to pay! What’s even better is that you finally get full ownership of your vehicle, which means you get to have the car title in your possession. 

For this to happen, all you have to do is remove the lien on the car title. Transportation agencies such as Barry Risk Management, Inc. can help you with this, and their representatives will ensure the title is transferred to you once the lienholder is off. 

3. Lost, stolen, or damaged title 

Sometimes, a car title can get lost, stolen, or damaged. The best way to prevent this is to keep your car title somewhere secure (and no, your car doesn’t count). It would help if you kept it in a safe with a lock so that no one can steal or damage it.  

But if one of those things happens, you’ll need to go to a transportation agency like Barry Risk Management, Inc. to get a new car title. The process won’t take long. You’ll just have to provide some information online, and then you’ll get your new title in no time. 

What is vehicle registration? 

the biggest differences between car title and registration

The next important document that you need to get is vehicle registration. Unlike a car title, which shows proof of ownership, registration proves that you’ve registered your vehicle with the state and have paid all of the relevant fees and taxes. 

This document is essential because it allows you to drive on public roads. Without vehicle registration, your motor vehicle is not known to the state, which could lead to a fine or even jail time. So, regardless of whether you’re leasing or buying a vehicle, you need to get it registered with the state. 

When you take this action, you’ll usually get a license plate and a registration document or sticker to put on your windshield. Regardless of the one that you receive, both will provide proof that you’ve registered your vehicle. 

However, just because you’ve registered your vehicle once doesn’t mean that you don’t have to do it again. Typically, every 1-2 years, you’ll need to renew your registration. But it’s essential to check the exact time frame because every state is different. 

Additionally, if you decide to move across state lines, you’ll want to register your vehicle with your new state. Most places require you to update your registration and license plate soon after you become a resident. 

How do you register a vehicle? 

Registering your vehicle is not as straightforward as getting a car title. Because every state has its own laws, the process for registering a car can vary

However, there are some common steps in the process that you may notice. For example, you typically need to insure your vehicle before you register it. Not every state is like this, but most of them are. 

Similarly, most states require the following information for you to register your vehicle: 

  • Insurance card
  • Driver’s license
  • Car title 
  • Application for vehicle registration
  • Statement of transaction
  • Proof of payment for fees and taxes
  • The bill of sale 

Once you gather those documents, usually, your last step is to fill out a registration form. Transportation agencies like Barry Risk Management, Inc. can provide this form and any other paperwork that you need to fill out. And if your state has unique requirements for registration, Barry Risk Management, Inc. can explain those and help you navigate them so that you successfully register your vehicle with your state.  

For help on registering your vehicle or getting a car title, contact a representative with Barry Risk Management, Inc!

How Often Should You Take a Defensive Driving Course?

how often should you take a defensive driving course?

Most likely, you’ve heard the term defensive driving

Maybe you’ve seen people take a defensive driving course to get themselves out of trouble. For example, sometimes you can take this class to remove a ticket from your record. Or, perhaps, you’ve seen other people take a proactive step and go through a defensive driving course to experience all the benefits they provide. 

While both reasons are on opposite ends of a spectrum, each one allows you to unlock benefits that you normally wouldn’t receive. Even more important is that a defensive driving course equips you to anticipate and handle emergencies that happen on the road. 

However, there’s a catch to all of these benefits. If you want to continuously encounter the advantages of a defensive driving course, you may have to take the class multiple times. 

Defensive driving courses are not like most classes that you take in school. For example, don’t have to take geometry in high school and again in college (unless it’s a part of your major). But with defensive driving, you may have to take the class one year and then again in a few years. 

In New York, for instance, you must take a defensive driving course every 36 months to keep your insurance benefits. Most states have the same requirements. 

However, some states, like Texas, are slightly different. While they require you to take a defensive driving course every three years to keep your insurance benefits, you also have to take the class once every year for ticket dismissal. 

Every state will have its own rules and requirements to help you maintain the benefits you received from your first defensive driving course. But if you don’t know all of the benefits you can experience from getting a defensive driving certification, you probably won’t care to take the course multiple times or even once.  

What is defensive driving?

Getting the motivation to take a class every so often can sound difficult, which is why it’s important to have a thorough understanding of all of the benefits you could receive. So, let’s start with the basics. 

What exactly is defensive driving? 

Simply put, a defensive driving course provides safe driving tactics that you can use in emergency situations or when you’re feeling fatigued, road rage, or emotional distress. Whether you’re a great driver or not, you can’t control what’s happening around you. 

When you’re on the road, you’re going to encounter bad weather, aggressive drivers, mechanical issues, and roadway obstacles, like a tree that’s fallen and blocked off half the street. These hazards are things you want to prepare for because they can jeopardize you and your passengers’ safety. 

What are the benefits of defensive driving?

how often should you take a defensive driving course to keep your benefits?

Once you complete a defensive driving course, you can unlock a handful of benefits. Specifically, there are four specific advantages that you may enjoy. 

1. Learn how to stay accident-free

Let’s start with the more obvious benefit. It doesn’t matter if you’re driving down the block or taking a road trip across the country. You will experience road hazards along the way. 

With a defensive driving course, you can learn how to anticipate and avoid potential threats that could hurt you and your passengers’ safety. A good class will teach you how to handle careless drivers, aggressive drivers, poor visibility, and dangers that can occur because of physical or emotional states. 

2. Freshen up on driving laws

Did you know that, on average, there are 6 million car accidents in the U.S. every year? Did you know that 3 million people in the U.S. are injured every year because of accidents and that 2 million drivers experience permanent injuries? 

Unless you’re a new driver, you probably haven’t reviewed any regulations or laws that you should follow on the road. Even worse, you probably haven’t looked at the new driving laws you should know if you’ve moved to a new state. 

However, if you want to prevent car accidents and keep you and others safe, use a defensive driving course to freshen up on rules and regulations. Reminders are great for even the most seasoned drivers. 

3. Experience insurance reductions

If you love a good deal, then you should take a defensive driving course. 

Most insurance companies will voluntarily reduce your insurance premium if you complete a defensive driving class. In other states, like Pennsylvania, insurance companies are required to provide discounts to drivers who successfully finish a defensive driving course. 

Sometimes, the reduction can be as much as 10%. And this discount can be considerable savings for parents who don’t want to pay exponentially higher rates when they add their teen drivers to their insurance policy. 

4. Decrease fines and points

Another great benefit of a defensive driving course is that it can remove points or dismiss tickets on your driving record. As you likely know, when you get too many tickets, you can face fines. And sometimes, you can get your license suspended. 

These consequences are bad news if you make a living as a driver, whether it’s for a ridesharing company, mail delivery service, or retailer. However, what’s worse is that you’ll have to allocate money to buses, cabs, and other means of transportation if you can’t drive.

5. Enjoy convenience 

This benefit applies to an online experience. When it comes to taking a defensive driving course, you have the option to take it online. 

With this path, you can take the class anytime, anywhere. You can use whatever device you have available to you. You can finish the course at your own pace. And you can access your defensive driving certification whenever you want. 

How to get a defensive driving certification 

Taking a defensive driving course has clear benefits. Even if you must take it multiple times throughout your life, it’s worth it. So, your next step should be simple: take the course. 

Barry Risk Management, Inc. offers the opportunity for you to take a defensive driving class and receive your certification. However, the best part is that the class is all online. You don’t have to leave your house. 

All you have to do is find a device that works best for you and start taking the course on your own time. And if you have any questions along the way, the representatives at Barry Risk Management, Inc. has you covered. 

Start taking a defensive driving course and get your certification by contacting Barry Risk Management, Inc. today!

What Happens When You Don’t Renew Vehicle Registration?

what happens when you don't renew vehicle registration?

For every action, there’s a reaction. If you regularly drink water, you’ll stay hydrated. If you work out consistently, you’ll get in shape. And if you get enough sleep, you’ll wake up refreshed.

These basic truths are obvious. Knowing that there’s a reaction for every action is to be expected, and that’s why it should come as no surprise to learn this: if you don’t renew your vehicle registration, you’ll face penalties.  

Usually, it’s easy to remember to do the necessary things in life, like taking care of your health and wellness. But when it comes to the not-so-every-day-things, like renewing your vehicle registration, it’s a little tougher to remember to write that item on your to-do list. 

However, what happens when you don’t renew your vehicle registration? What are the specific consequences that you may face? Well, the straightforward answer is that it depends on the state you live in. Nevertheless, there are a few general penalties that you might notice no matter where you live.

The consequences of not renewing vehicle registration

Your vehicle registration must be renewed every year or every few years—the exact amount of time will vary depending on the state you call home. 

However, if you don’t know when it’s time to renew your registration, and therefore, forget to do it, you may face two things: a ticket and a fine. 

With expired vehicle registration, you open up the door for a police officer to pull you over and ticket you for a lapse in car registration. In addition, you may have to pay a fee to the state because of your mistake.

These consequences may not sound like a big deal at first. But after so many tickets and fines, you’ll start to notice how much money you could save by just renewing your registration instead of paying the penalties. 

You also may think it’s worth updating your registration if you have to face more consequences on top of all the fees. Not renewing your vehicle registration could lead to more expensive car insurance rates. And in the worst-case scenario, failing to renew your registration could mean losing your car. 

It’s not uncommon to see a vehicle get impounded because the owner forgot—or blatantly avoided—to renew their registration. In this scenario, you can’t get your vehicle back until you update your registration and pay all of your fines. Sometimes, that fine even includes the impound and towing fees. 

While these penalties may sound extreme, there is good news. Sometimes, states will offer a grace period for you to renew your vehicle registration. For example, Oklahoma, Iowa, and Colorado provide a one-month grace period after your registration expires, whereas Texas only offers a five day grace period.

It’s important to check with your state to see if a grace period is available. Hopefully, you’ll have a little wiggle room to renew your registration. But if you live in a major city, like New York City, for example, you may find that a grace period does not exist. 

Can you have expired registration during a pandemic? 

Remembering to renew your car registration during “normal” times is already difficult. Today, it’s easy to always have something going on, so registration renewal may be the last thing on your mind. And this sentiment is even more true during a pandemic. 

Because of COVID-19, many states have offered some leeway when it comes to renewing your vehicle registration. Keeping citizens healthy and safe during a pandemic is of utmost priority for many state officials. So, most local leaders don’t enforce penalties if your registration expired in 2020. 

However, does this freedom mean that it’s okay to have expired registration? The answer is simple: no. Even though most states are trying to be flexible when it comes to enforcing penalties, they do have an extended deadline for you to renew your car registration. 

For example, in New York, Governor Cuomo issued an executive order towards the end of March that extended the expiration date of vehicle registration and inspections. These registrations had to be valid as of March 27, 2020.

As time went on, Cuomo extended the order multiple times until it finally expired on November 3, 2020. However, to give people enough time to renew their registration, he signed an order that prevented police from giving tickets to drivers that had expired vehicle registration. 

Unfortunately, though, this order has expired. As of December 1, 2020, police officers can ticket you if you don’t have up-to-date registration in New York. So, even though there’s a pandemic, you still need to renew your documents. With extensions and executive orders expiring, you will start to face consequences for driving with outdated registration.

How much does it cost to renew vehicle registration? 

how much do you have to pay to renew vehicle registration

If you don’t want to face penalties for having expired registration, you need to get this taken care of sooner rather than later. However, to do that, there’s something you need to consider: the costs. 

Renewing your vehicle registration will cost money, and the renewal fees will differ depending on the state you live in. Some states are unique and require you to pay a fee based on the type of license plate that you have. 

For example, in Chicago, a standard renewal sticker costs $151. If you have a personalized plate, that cost increases slightly to $158. And if you have a vanity plate, the price for renewal goes up to $164. 

Other states look at a list of factors to determine how much you have to pay to renew your registration. In New Jersey, for instance, the cost is based on your vehicle’s model and weight

If you have a model from 1970 or older and it weighs under 2,700 lbs, you’ll have to pay $35 for registration renewal. If that model weighs between 2,700 lbs – 3,800 lbs, you’ll have to pay around $44. 

Every state is different, so it’s important to check the costs to ensure you know what you need to pay. Don’t listen to a friend or relative that lives in another state and doesn’t know your state’s laws. 

How to renew your vehicle registration

When it’s time to renew your registration, where do you go? You have two options: the DMV or a transportation agency. 

The first option is the most common one, although it does require you to wrestle with the endless hassles at the DMV. Taking this route, especially during a pandemic, means you’ll have to make an appointment for months out and wait in a long line for someone to assist you. However, it could also mean that you go on your state’s DMV website to renew your registration. But even then, the process is not so simple. 

If you want to avoid this unnecessary headache, option two is the best route to take. Transportation agencies like Barry Risk Management, Inc. can renew your registration quickly and easily—and it can all happen online. 

With over 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, Barry Risk Management, Inc. has the skill set and ability to handle your registration renewal so that you don’t get penalized. It doesn’t matter where you live. The representatives at Barry Risk Management, Inc. will ensure your registration complies with your state’s specific laws. 

For help renewing your registration, contact an agent at Barry Risk Management, Inc. today!

How to Get an Auto Dealer Bond In New York

how to get an auto dealer bond in NYC

If you’re an auto dealer in New York, there are a few things that you know you need. You need a car dealer license, motor vehicles to sell, a decent-sized lot, and a handful of salespeople if you’re just starting out. 

These are obvious necessities for your business. However, there’s something else that’s just as important to have and that states even require: an auto dealer bond. 

In states like New York, you must have an auto dealer bond if you want to operate as a car dealer. But, more often than not, most people know nothing about auto dealer bonds. 

They don’t know what they are, what they cover, how much they cost, or even how to get one. And that’s why this article will clear the smoke, pull back the curtain, and demystify one of the most essential things that every auto dealer in New York needs. 

What is an auto dealer bond?

how to get an auto dealer bond to protect customers

Some people call an auto dealer bond a car bond—and honestly, both terms are correct. They each mean the same thing. Regardless of the phrase you use, this type of bond is a legally binding contract that protects customers, including everyday consumers and state or local agencies.  

This protection allows customers to take recourse when they’re exposed to fraud or misrepresentation during a business transaction. For example, maybe you decide to sell a car that has invalid tags. Whether you knowingly or unknowingly do this, your customer has the right to file a claim on your bond. 

When your customer takes this step, the business that’s backing your bond will pay the costs for your mistake. But the company will only pay up to the amount of the required bond. Then, you’ll have to reimburse the business. You don’t get to walk away scotch free. 

This series of events will occur anytime you don’t follow the applicable regulations and laws that your state has for auto dealers. And the only time you can get away with avoiding a customer’s claim is if the claim on your bond is illegitimate, meaning it’s false.  

Another thing you should keep in mind is that there are different types of auto dealer bonds. The one you choose will depend on your state’s requirements and the types of vehicles you’d like to sell. Some of the most popular bonds include: 

  • Used auto dealer bonds
  • New auto dealer bonds
  • Mobile home dealer bonds
  • Motor vehicle bond
  • Wholesale dealer bond

Each of these bonds is tailored to the type of dealership that you’ll run, so make sure you get the right one for your business. 

What does an auto dealer bond cover? 

While it’s important to know what an auto dealer bond is, you also need to know the ins-and-outs of what it covers. As previously mentioned, an auto dealer bond will protect customers who are exposed to fraud or misrepresentation during a business transaction. But what that fraud or misrepresentation looks like can vary. 

Sometimes, it can look like a deliberate mistake you’ve made, or it can look like a simple error and misunderstanding. For better context, here’s a list of scenarios in which a customer can make a claim on your bond: 

  • Selling stolen motor vehicles
  • Forgetting or avoiding to pay sales tax and fees to the state
  • Not reporting a sale
  • Committing financial fraud
  • Fraudulently representing a motor vehicle during a transaction
  • Withholding vehicle titles
  • Failing to meet warranty obligations
  • Refusing to pay for a trade-in vehicle
  • Forgetting or avoiding to pay lenders
  • Giving a check that’s returned for insufficient funds

Clearly, the list of protections that customers get from an auto dealer bond is vast. And while it might seem like you have to walk a tightrope when you have an auto dealer bond, you don’t have to do that. You just have to follow the law and handle your business responsibly. 

How much does an auto dealer bond cost? 

the costs of an auto dealer bond

As with most things, the price of an auto dealer bond will vary. What you pay in New York will depend on the state’s requirements, especially since the state handles licensing. However, three other primary factors can also influence the cost of your auto dealer bond. 

1. The amount of the bond

If the amount of your bond is significant, your costs will be higher than bonds that cover a lower amount. 

For example, if you have a $200,000 auto dealer bond, then the costs you have to pay will be higher than if you had a $10,000 bond. 

2. Your credit history 

Like it or not, your credit score plays a critical role in determining how much you pay for your auto dealer bond. 

If you have a credit score that’s 700 or higher, you’ll likely pay 1-4% of the total bond amount. If your credit score is 650 or lower, you’ll likely pay 5-20% of the total bond amount. 

3. Your history of losses  

Unfortunately, there are some bonds that have a significant number of losses. And the company backing your bond will take this factor into consideration when determining the cost of your auto dealer bond. 

Bonds with minimal historic losses will come with lower costs than ones with higher historic losses, which will come with a premium price tag. 

How do you get an auto dealer bond? 

Regardless of the costs for your auto dealer bond, you need to get one. It protects your customers, provides necessary coverage, and it’s required. But how do you get an auto dealer bond in New York? 

Luckily, the answer is simple. Use Barry Risk Management, Inc. 

While typically known for their DMV expertise, Barry Risk Management, Inc. has a parent company named Barry Risk Management. This business specializes in helping people discover and buy the best coverage for their everyday needs, including auto dealer bonds. 

With the guidance of Barry Risk Management, you can trust Barry Risk Management, Inc. to get the auto dealer bond that you need in New York. The only thing you have to do is reach out to a representative, and that agent will have the insight and knowledge to ensure they meet your business needs. 

To get your auto dealer bond, contact an agent at Barry Risk Management, Inc. today!  

How to Remove a Lien on a Car Title

how to remove a lien on a car title if you want sell your vehicle

Selling your car doesn’t immediately sound like a difficult process. If you’ve never done it before, you may assume that you only have to find an interested buyer, get the money from them, and hand them the title and keys to your car. Sounds easy enough, right? 

Luckily, if you’ve paid off the loan for your motor vehicle, this process is, in fact, that easy. However, if you’re still making payments, there will be a lien on your car title that you need to remove before you can ever sell your vehicle. 

Research suggests that a record 107 million Americans have auto loan debt. This number is about 43% of the entire adult U.S. population, which is a drastic increase from what experts saw in 2012. 

During that time, only 80 million Americans were making car payments. But today, you can probably find multiple relatives, friends, coworkers, or even strangers with an auto loan. 

Having this type of financial support isn’t necessarily a bad thing. In fact, a car loan may be the very reason you have your vehicle today—but it does become an issue when you want to sell your car. When that situation arises, you must remove the lien on your car title before you can take any further steps. 

What is a lien on a car title? 

Simply put, a lien protects creditors. It provides them with legal claims against pieces of property to ensure they collect the money they’re owed. 

For example, maybe you had to finance your vehicle through a bank or auto dealer. In those cases, you’d consider them as your creditors. And when you apply for a car title, you’d have to be transparent about who your lender is.

Once you apply, the lien will go and remain on your title until you finish paying your debt. Only then will your lender help remove the lien so that you can sell your vehicle. 

Who holds a lien on your vehicle? 

you must know who holds the lien on a car title if you want to remove the lien on the car title.

There are instances where your lienholder may not be an auto loan lender. For example, some states allow mechanics to put a lien on your car title if you haven’t paid them within a certain amount of time. However, more often than not, your auto loan lender will be the only one to hold the lien on your car. 

Depending on where you live, the lender will file the lien with your state’s Department of Motor Vehicles. And after you’ve paid off your debt, the lender will send another document to the DMV to release the lien so that the car title can be updated and transferred to you. 

This method is a simple process. The only thing you have to do is keep up with your car payments. Then, you can pay off your loan and have the freedom to sell your vehicle whenever you want. 

The only time you’ll experience obstacles is when you aren’t paying your creditor. There are about 6 million Americans who are 90 days or more behind on their car payments. When you’re in this situation, it becomes very challenging to sell your vehicle because you’ve not only failed to pay off your loan, but you’ve also fallen behind. 

This mishap can even lead to consequences since you’re not the legal owner of your vehicle. For example, your auto lender could repossess your car if you default on the loan. And then it’ll be impossible to sell your car. 

Can a buyer pay your auto loan to remove a lien? 

If you’re unable to pay your auto loan, you may still have an opportunity to sell your car. You just might have to rely on your potential buyer. 

Sometimes, a buyer can write a check out to your lienholder to pay the loan’s remaining balance. However, you’ll need to get your creditor’s approval to take this route. 

Make sure you call your lienholder for permission. If they agree to the terms, you can sell your vehicle, and the car title will be transferred to the new buyer. 

What happens after you pay your debt? 

While paying off your debt is the first step you must take to remove a lien on a car title, it’s not the last. If you want to finish removing a lien, you need to get help from a transportation organization. 

Typically, people like to visit their local DMV office to finish this process. The DMV will have the necessary forms you need to fill out. And it’s also the place where you can take any letter from your lender indicating the lien’s release. 

However, the DMV is also the place where you have to suffer through long lines, boring waiting rooms, sometimes grumpy employees, and unhappy customers. What’s worse is that the pandemic has made the DMV even slower and more stressful than usual.

These days, it’s hard to book an appointment. The lines are out the door, and the DMV’s calendar is full for months on end. Right now, especially, the DMV isn’t a place that you want to visit for help. The organization has a backlog that would make anyone want to scream.

But if you’ve paid off your loan and want to remove the lien on your car title, who can you go to for assistance? 

Who to use to remove a lien on a car title

When you need help removing a lien on your car title, you don’t have to go to the DMV. You have other options, and one of those options is Barry Risk Management, Inc.. 

With over 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, Barry Risk Management, Inc. can help remove an auto lien quickly and without any hassle. And the best part is that Barry Risk Management, Inc. can do it all online. 

You don’t have to leave your home. You don’t have to stand in a long line. And you don’t have to sit in a boring waiting room. 

All you have to do is get in touch with a representative from Barry Risk Management, Inc., and the agent will complete everything digitally. If they need you to fill out a document or submit any information, you can complete the task online. 

Barry Risk Management, Inc. makes things easy and simple. So, if you’ve finished paying off your auto loan and want to continue removing the lien on your car title, contact Barry Risk Management, Inc. for help. They’ll make sure you have everything you need to sell your vehicle in no time. 

Reach out here to speak with a representative with Barry Risk Management, Inc. so that you can remove the lien on your car title!  

How to Do a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) Search

how to do a vehicle identification number search

Imagine your dream car. It can be whatever you like—maybe it’s a Mercedes G-Wagon, Porsche, or Rolls Royce. Or, perhaps it’s something exotic and futuristic like an Ashton Martin.

Regardless of what it is, you may be imagining your dream car as a brand new vehicle with untouched leather seats, zero damages, and touch screen devices that have no fingerprints. But what if you can’t get your dream car brand new? What if you have to get one that someone has already used?

Just because you find yourself in this situation doesn’t mean you can’t get your dream car in great condition. In fact, you can get your dream car in near perfect condition even though someone has already owned and driven it for a period of time.

You just have to do a VIN search. By taking this step, you can ensure you purchase a used version of your dream car in a condition that’s actually worth buying. 

What is a VIN?

When you’re in the market for your dream car—or any car, for that matter—you need to check the vehicle’s history if it’s a used automobile. You can achieve this goal by looking at the Vehicle Identification Number, which is the formal way of saying VIN. 

This 17-digit number is a unique code that’s gets assigned to every car that someone has used. With the VIN, you can easily check a car’s history so that you have all of the information you need to discern whether or not you want to buy a car in used condition. 

What’s also great about using a VIN is that it allows you to see what you may not notice on the surface. For example, you can look at the inside and outside of a vehicle and quickly catch any scratches, tears, dents, and any other eyesores. 

But you can’t look at the inside or outside of a vehicle to tell if someone’s totaled it. This insight is something you can only gain access to by utilizing the car’s VIN. With it, you can become privy to several things, including: 

  • Whether or not the vehicle has been in an accident
  • If the vehicle experienced flood damage
  • If someone has totaled the vehicle in the past 
  • What the previous owner(s) used the vehicle for (lease, taxi, rental, etc.)
  • The condition of the airbags and whether they’re safe
  • If there are any open recalls  
  • What the service history is for the vehicle 
  • Details about the title, including junk or salvage titles
  • The vehicle’s ownership history 
  • Damages to the vehicle’s structure or frame
  • Rollbacks on the odometer 

Thorough information on a used vehicle is what you need to consider to make the right purchasing decision. You don’t want to get stuck with a car that breaks down on you the second you grab the keys and drive off the lot. Instead, you need to buy a vehicle that’s safe and in excellent condition, even if someone has already used it. 

How to understand a VIN 

vehicle identification number search

While doing a VIN search is critical to buying a great used vehicle, you can’t take this step if you don’t know how to. Before you can check the VIN, you first have to understand how to read it. 

When you look at a VIN, the 17-digits will represent the vehicle’s year, make, model, engine, location of manufacture, plant code, production number, and more. Sometimes, you might find older vehicles with a VIN that’s 16 characters—but even in those cases, you’ll still discover a lot of information about your desired motor vehicle. 

However, to guarantee you get the most out of using your VIN, here’s a brief explanation about how to decode each number. 

1. The first three digits

When you look at the first three digits in the VIN, you get to see the World Manufacturer Identifier (WMI) number. This particular part of the VIN clues you into three specific things: 

  • Country of origin: The very first digit in the VIN will tell you the vehicle’s final point of assembly. Sometimes, this is the location where manufacturers produced the vehicle. But other times, the country of origin is the location of the manufacturer’s headquarters. 
  • Manufacturer: If you want to learn who manufactured the vehicle and the region it was made in, you should look at the second digit in the VIN. 
  • Type: When you review the third digit in the VIN, you’ll learn the vehicle type and the specific manufacturing division that created it. 

The first three digits in the VIN offer some of the most foundational information about the used automobile. And while these insights might seem unimportant, they can help determine if you actually want to buy the car, especially if you care about who manufactured it.    

2. Digits four through nine 

When you start looking at digits four through nine, you’re checking out the Vehicle Descriptor Section. 

Specifically, digits four through eight will reveal the model, engine type, transmission, and body style. Many service shops prefer to reference this information to ensure they understand the vehicle’s systems to service it properly. 

However, the ninth digit is just as important. This number helps determine if a VIN is even valid. The Department of Transportation uses a mathematical formula to create the ninth digit, and with it, you have complete visibility into whether a vehicle has the correct VIN and history. 

3. Digits 10 – 17  

The remaining digits in the VIN suggest the Vehicle Identifier Section. The tenth digit will reveal the model year. The 11th digit will suggest the manufacturing plant that produced the vehicle. And the last digits typically provide the serial number, which tells you when in the sequence the vehicle came off the assembly line. 

Where to find the VIN

Now that you know how to decode a VIN, you may be wondering where you can find it on a vehicle. Luckily, it’s pretty easy to detect. 

You can usually discover a VIN on the dashboard or jamb sticker on the driver’s side door. However, if you can’t find it there, you can also look on the engine, in the trunk, on the frame inside the hood, or in a spare tire area. Those places might sound like unique locations for a VIN, but you’ll sometimes find them in those particular spots. 

How to do a VIN search

Knowing how to understand and find a VIN means you have almost everything you need to do a VIN search. Your last step is just to find a credible company to look up the VIN. 

Your first thought may be to go to the DMV for this service. However, you don’t want to wait in long lines or schedule an appointment for months in advance. Barry Risk Management, Inc. can do a VIN search quickly and easily to ensure you get the historical data you need in a timely manner. 

By using Barry Risk Management, Inc., you’ll get a complete list of accidents, previous owners, repairs, and more so that you know exactly what you’re buying. 

Contact a representative with Barry Risk Management, Inc. today to do the VIN search that you need.