Why Vehicle Pickup and Delivery Offers Customers Convenience

vehicle pickup and delivery

If there’s one thing that your customers want, it’s convenience. In today’s world, many consumers seek convenience, even preferring it over equally important factors like price.  

Just look at Amazon Prime. For a little over $10 per month, you can have purchased products on your doorstep within 24 hours. Also, consider food delivery apps. Postmates, Uber Eats, DoorDash, and Grubhub have become staples in society. Even on a nice day, when you can easily hop in your car and pick up your food, it’s tempting to use a delivery service instead of leaving the comfort of your home. 

With convenience reigning in most people’s lives, your customers expect ease and simplicity from every brand they purchase from, including your dealership. It doesn’t matter if you’re not running a billion-dollar e-commerce brand or a food delivery service app. Convenience is not bound to a specific industry—it’s a desire that your customers have for every single brand they come into contact with.  

That’s why your dealership must take steps to offer the same convenience that other companies are providing. If it doesn’t, your brand won’t succeed long-term, and that’s not an exaggeration. 

Luckily, offering this convenience isn’t a hard thing to do. In fact, something as simple as vehicle pickup and delivery can significantly increase your customers’ happiness and satisfaction. 

Why vehicle pickup and delivery is crucial 

The pandemic made one thing very clear for dealerships: you can’t rely on foot traffic. When consumers were confined to their homes, every business struggled, including dealerships that didn’t offer a touchless experience. 

If their customers couldn’t come to the lot, they couldn’t buy a car. Similarly, if they couldn’t drive to the service center, they couldn’t get an oil change or the tune-up they needed. 

This reality forced auto companies to reconcile with the fact that they had to make life easier for their customers. However, don’t get the wrong idea—dealerships have always needed a way to offer more convenience, but the pandemic made that fact crystal clear. 

Even now, as life starts to normalize, people are still wary of coming into dealerships. Crowds and too much face-to-face interaction are not things that everyone is currently comfortable with, especially if they can avoid it. And if you’re assuming your dealership can hold out until life is completely back to normal and foot traffic is on the rise, you may find yourself disappointed. 

Many auto brands—both large and small—are starting to replace face-to-face transactions with touchless experiences like vehicle pickup and delivery services. Brands that were doing it pre-pandemic are now making it the central focus of their business.  

If you’re not doing the same, consumers who had your dealership top-of-mind will remember the auto company down the street and call that one instead. Convenience is king, so regardless of whether there’s a pandemic, your customers will buy from the dealership that’s making their lives easier. 

The benefits of vehicle pickup and delivery 

why vehicle pickup and delivery benefits customers

When it comes to vehicle pickup and delivery services, there are a couple of ways that your auto dealership can provide them. 

One option is to deliver the vehicle that your customer has purchased. If you have online sales capabilities, where customers don’t have to come onto the lot to purchase a car, you can complete this process by delivering their vehicle to them. 

The second option is also simple: pick up the vehicle that needs servicing and deliver it to your customer once it’s ready. This offer will allow consumers to skip the hassle of waiting in line to check in their car and get a loaner vehicle. With your help, customers can simply sit at home while you take care of the details. 

Of course, you can implement both of these options. Doing so would give your customers all of the convenience they seek, which would come with many benefits. 

For example, Brain Benstock, who works at Paragon Honda-Acura in New York City, told Automotive News that his department’s valet program—a vehicle pickup and delivery service—expanded to more than 3,000 trips per month in a little over two years. Major automakers like Audi, Infinity, General Motors, and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles also have local dealers implementing pickup and delivery services because they know how beneficial it is for their customers and success. 

By offering this type of convenience, growth spurts in sales and customer retention are inevitable. Customers who have used vehicle and pickup services even claim that the offering is a “great experience” and “amazing and unique” and that it saved them “time and effort.” 

How to offer convenience to customers

While providing a pickup and delivery service is an excellent idea, it can go terribly wrong if you don’t do it correctly. What’s also important to know is that it can come with costs if you’re not careful. 

Management software, increased labor spending, complexities in your customer’s schedules, and the risk of getting into an accident while driving your customers’ vehicles are all factors you have to consider. Consequently, you may not have the easiest time implementing this strategy. 

After all, even though 67 percent of auto dealers created some sort of vehicle pickup and delivery department in April 2020, only 59 percent of dealers still offer it. The difficulties are sometimes too much to handle, which is why you need to find experts who can help you roll out and maintain this program.

Barry Risk Management has a team of experienced professionals who can help your dealership implement and manage its vehicle pickup and delivery services. With over 30 years of experience in the industry, the representatives at Barry Risk Management know how to handle unforeseen delays, mishaps, schedules, and consumer needs to increase dealer efficiency, enhance customer service, and grow customer satisfaction. 

You don’t have to do this all on your own. Since this type of offering is new territory for so many dealerships, lean on companies like Barry Risk Management for help. The representative you work with will ensure your customers enjoy the convenience they’re seeking so that your sales and retention rates soar. 

For help implementing a vehicle pickup and delivery service, call 1-888-995-TAGS(8247) to speak with a representative at Barry Risk Management. 

What is Dealership Insurance?

what is dealership insurance

Starting any type of business is challenging, but it’s especially difficult when your business requires you to look after employees and a large inventory. For example, perhaps you own a dealership. In this scenario, you have to consider multiple factors to set your company up for success, and one of those factors is dealership insurance.  

This piece of the puzzle is a crucial part of your business plan. Running a successful dealership doesn’t solely hinge on the sleek motor vehicles on your lot and the great salespeople on your team. If you want your dealership to thrive, you need insurance. 

But what exactly is this type of insurance, and how much does it cost? While it’s not easy to find these answers online, that doesn’t mean the answers aren’t important. In fact, you should know everything there is to know about dealership insurance before you try to get it. That way, you understand what you’re looking for and know what to expect as you search for it. 

Do you need dealership insurance? 

It’s a common misconception that buying insurance for your business is an added cost that comes with little to no benefits, but that thinking couldn’t be further from the truth. There are long-term advantages of having insurance for your dealership. With so many things out of your control, your company is always at risk and easily exposed to various financial obligations and liability costs. 

For example, what if someone breaks into your showroom and steals the most precious car in your collection? Or, what if your inventory burns because a fire happens in your stockroom? Even worse, what if you’re showing a customer around your dealership, and they slip and fall? 

All of these scenarios are ones that you can’t prevent. They can happen at any time and any point of the day, and all you can do is react appropriately. If you want to have a good reaction, you need dealership insurance. With it, you won’t get overwhelmed and discouraged because of bad events.

Which dealerships need insurance? 

Outside of the benefits of auto dealer insurance, you may be wondering if your specific dealership needs coverage. After all, there are many types of dealerships, so is insurance only applicable to a certain few? 

Honestly speaking, the answer is no. Auto dealer insurance applies to any garage-related business. For example, you can get dealership insurance if you have one of the following companies:

  • New and used car dealership
  • Motorcycle dealership
  • Motor vehicle dealership
  • Recreational vehicle dealership
  • Powersports dealership
  • Boat and heavy equipment dealership
  • Trailer dealership
  • Auto transmission repair and glass installation
  • General auto repair and service
  • Truck repair and body installation
  • Auto body shop and restoration
  • Auto detailing shops

Any of these businesses can benefit from having dealership insurance, so if you have one of these companies, don’t hesitate to get a policy. 

Types of dealership insurance 

types of dealership insurance

When you decide to get auto dealer insurance, you should seek coverage that’s personalized to your dealership. Luckily, there are many types of dealership insurance that you can choose from, and the one you move forward with should factor in the number of employees you have, the state your business is in, your dealership’s size, and your financial capability.  

1. General Liability 

This type of coverage is the foundation of all liability insurance. It offers diverse protection for auto dealers because it provides coverage for property damage, libel, copyright infringement, bodily injury, slander, misleading advertisements, and more. Additionally, general liability pays for medical expenses that rack up from business operations as well as settlement expenditures and legal costs. 

2. Workers Compensation

It should go without saying that workers’ compensation is necessary for any business. Most states in the U.S. require companies to have this type of policy because it protects you—as the employer—and your employees. 

With workers’ compensation, you’ll get coverage for lost wages and medical expenses that occur because of work-related illnesses or injuries. Additionally, you’ll receive protection if lawsuits regarding negligence ever come up. 

3. Employment Practices Liability Insurance (EPLI)

This insurance is crucial if you have employees, even if your dealership is small. Employment Practices Liability Insurance (EPLI) provides protection for employment-related incidents like wrongful termination, breach of contract, harassment, discrimination, and other work-related issues. 

4. Garage Keepers Liability 

While this policy is optional, it’s still just as important. Garage Keepers Liability helps you if your customer’s vehicle is damaged. It offers protection for theft, extreme weather, vandalism, fire damage, and collision damages that occur at your dealership. It also pays for claims while your customer’s car is in your custody, control, care, or possession. 

5. Garage Liability Insurance

This insurance is quite different than the one above, even though it’s easy to use them interchangeably. Unlike the policy mentioned above, Garage Liability Insurance provides coverage for property damage and bodily injury that happens because of an accident at your dealership. If you want to protect your business when accidents happen, then you need to get this coverage. 

6. Business income 

No business is immune to natural disasters. It doesn’t matter where your business is located—it can get caught in a bad storm. And if you want your dealership to continue operating after the natural disaster ends, you need business income insurance, which covers any lost income. 

For example, maybe you need help covering business expenses that add up during the restoration period or need assistance with payroll expenses. In these cases, business income insurance is great.

7. Errors and Omissions Insurance

At an auto dealership, you’re supposed to help customers look for new and used vehicles, which means you work in the service industry. Because you give professional advice to customers on a regular basis, errors and omissions insurance is critical. 

This type of coverage kicks in when your team doesn’t complete its work correctly. For example, if someone misses a critical step while providing a service or omits information that could harm customers, you want errors and omission insurance to protect you. 

How much does auto dealer insurance cost? 

Like most types of insurance, the cost of dealership insurance depends on a variety of factors. Consequently, it’s not easy to give you a specific rate in a blog post, but it is easy to tell you what insurance companies consider when determining your fee. 

For example, a few factors come into play, including the following: 

  • The size of your dealership (i.e., the number of vehicles for sales, the square footage, and total business value) 
  • What state your dealership is in 
  • The number of employees at your dealership 
  • The number of insurance policies you choose
  • The types of insurance policies that you purchase

If you want a specific quote for your auto dealer insurance, it’s essential to speak with an insurance company. But please keep in mind that it’s critical to contact the right business. 

Most companies will give you insurance quotes that change at any given moment. Typically, none of the quotes are reliable until you commit, and that’s why it’s important to speak with the right insurance company. 

Barry Risk Management is an excellent option if you want a rock-solid insurance quote that won’t change in the blink of an eye. Backed by a team with more than 30 years of experience, Barry Risk Management can find the right insurance policies for your dealership and give you a reasonable price that you can count on. 

Just call 1-888-995-TAGS(8247) to speak with a representative at Barry Risk Management. They’ll give you a fast and reliable quote for your dealership insurance. 

How to Surrender License Plates

how to surrender license plates

Sometimes, you have to give up things in life. 

When you have a goal, you have to let go of distractions. When you have a job, you have to give up your time. And when you have a motor vehicle, you have to surrender your license plates in certain situations. 

Whether you have vintage license plates or regular ones, there are specific times in your life when you’ll have to return them. And when this happens, it’s easy to wonder how to surrender your license plates. After all, no one really talks about it. 

Are you supposed to go through a specific process? Or, can you throw the plates in the trash? Depending on the circumstance, both of these answers are actually correct. But to truly understand which route to take, this article will explain everything you need to know about how to surrender license plates.  

When to surrender your license plates

As previously mentioned, there are certain times when you need to surrender your license plates. Specific rules will vary depending on the state. However, usually, there are a handful of reasons you might have to return your plates: 

  • You sell or get rid of your vehicle, and you don’t plan to use the license plates again
  • You drop the liability insurance for your vehicle for whatever reason 
  • You’re getting repairs or storing your vehicle for a lengthy period of time, and you prefer not to maintain your liability insurance
  • You move to a different state and register your vehicle in that state
  • You transfer your vehicle’s ownership to someone else

Again, the rules will vary depending on the state, so make you check your state’s guidelines. Additionally, it’s important to know if your state even requires you to surrender license plates. Currently, only the following places ask for old plates:

  • Alaska
  • Connecticut 
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana 
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island 
  • South Carolina 
  • Vermont
  • Wyoming
  • Washington D.C.

If you live in one of these states, make sure to turn in your license plates at the proper time. But if you don’t call one of these states home, you don’t have to worry about surrendering your license plates, although you still need to render them useless. 

How to dispose of old license plates

how to surrender license plates that are old

When you live in a state that doesn’t require you to return your license plates, it’s still in your best interest to destroy them when necessary. If you keep old, unused plates, they could fall into the wrong hands, and someone could use them to commit a crime. This situation can create a significant problem since you’re the original owner of the plates, so make sure to destroy them when you’re done using them. 

You can easily do this by recycling the plates at a local cycling center. Just make sure you remove all insurance and registration stickers in advance. Also, another option is to deface the license plates so that you obscure the letters and numbers. Then, you can put these damaged plates into the trash or recycling bin. 

Can you surrender license plates temporarily?

When you live in a state that requires you to surrender your license plates, you don’t always have to take a permanent approach. For example, perhaps you want to stop driving for a while. In that case, you can cancel your insurance and surrender your plates until you want to start driving again. 

However, maybe you’re not in a position to choose whether you keep your plates. Perhaps you’re getting forced to surrender your license plates because you’ve lost your driving privileges. This situation can happen if you’ve been driving recklessly or have received a DUI. And in these cases, you have to give up your plates for a specific amount of days or months. 

What happens if your license plates are stolen, lost, or destroyed?

Inconvenient things always happen, and that’s true no matter what you’re doing. If your license plates are stolen, destroyed, or lost before you turn them in, the best step is to file a police report. That way, someone doesn’t use your plates to commit a crime. 

Once you’ve completed that step, you need to decide whether or not you want new plates. If you do, you’ll have to show the DMV or transportation agency the police report to prove your license plates are no longer in great condition or even in your possession. Additionally, you’ll likely need to pay a small fee and provide the following information: 

  • Driver’s license
  • Proof of insurance
  • Vehicle registration

If you have no intentions of getting new license plates, you don’t have to do anything but file a police report. After that, you can wipe your hands clean and call it a day. 

How to surrender license plates 

When it’s time to surrender your plates, there are two ways you can go about it. The first one is to use the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). If you take this route, you can return your license plates through the mail or in person. 

For example, in New York, you can surrender your plates through the mail by following the specific steps:

  • Updating your address if necessary 
  • Removing plates and stickers
  • Completing the PD-7 application 
  • Mail the application with your plates in an envelope 

If you’d prefer to visit a local DMV office in New York, you’ll complete steps 2-4. But instead of mailing in your application and plates, you’ll just bring them into the office. 

While these options sound straightforward, the DMV is never as straightforward as it seems. The long wait times and constant back-and-forth can leave you feeling drained and frustrated, so if you want an easier process, you should consider the second way to surrender your plates: use a transportation agency. 

Not every agency is great, but the best ones will speed up the process to make it as simple as possible for you to return your license plates. You just need to find a good transportation agency that you can trust. 

Why you should use Barry Risk Management 

Barry Risk Management is the best transportation agency that you can use to surrender your license plates. Not only does the company have over 30 years of experience in the industry, but it also allows you to do everything online. 

Most transportation agencies are like the DMV. They require you to come in person or mail things in to complete your tasks. But with Barry Risk Management, you can surrender your plates using a completely online process. There’s no reason to leave the comfort of your own home. 

What’s even better is that Barry Risk Management can help you no matter where you live. The representatives can tell you if your state requires plate surrender and help you do it successfully and efficiently. That way, you’re not stuck doing the research and process all by yourself. 

To surrender your license plates in your state, contact Barry Risk Management at 1-888-995-TAGS(8247).

How to Get a New Auto Title

how to get a new auto title

When you own a car, you receive an important document. This document is an auto title, and it’s something that people typically tell you not to lose or damage. Otherwise, it could cause trouble. 

Usually, you safeguard this piece of information the best way that you can, hoping nothing happens to it. But what do you do when the worst-case scenario occurs, and you lose or damage your auto title? 

If you’ve found yourself in this predicament, it’s easy to panic and wonder what to do next. However, if you want to learn how to get a new auto title, this article will provide one easy tip that you can use. 

What is an auto title?

Before learning how to get a new auto title, it’s essential to revisit the purpose of having this document. This information might be old news to some of you, in which case this will be a good refresher. But if you’ve never learned what an auto title is, this definition will explain why it’s so critical to safeguard this document. 

Put simply, an auto title proves that you own your motor vehicle. Without it, you have no way of showing that you possess ownership of your car. 

Depending on the state you live in, the information on the auto title will vary. However, it’ll always include a vehicle identification number (VIN) and the signature of state officials who are in charge of motor vehicles or revenue collection. 

Typically, an auto title will also include the following:

  • Vehicle make
  • Vehicle model or body type
  • Vehicle year 
  • The owners of the vehicle 
  • The owner’s address
  • Odometer reading 
  • The date the title was issued 

Sometimes, your auto title may have more specific information. Yours could provide your license plate number, your vehicle’s weight, a title number, the engine number, the number of cylinders in the engine, and the type of fuel your vehicle uses. Additionally, some states require that you add information about salvage or flood damage. 

Why is a car title important? 

why is a new auto title important

You want a car title because it’ll prove that you own your vehicle—that’s the primary benefit of the document. But there are practical ways where you’ll see this benefit play out. For example, an auto title is important in the following situations.

1. Someone steals your car

If someone steals your motor vehicle, how do you prove that the thief doesn’t own your car? You refer to your auto title. Without this document, the police won’t believe that you possess ownership of your vehicle. 

2. You want to sell your car

You can’t sell your vehicle without an auto title. The buyer will ask you to transfer the title to them to prove they’re the new owners. But if you don’t have your auto title, the buyer is going to walk away

3. Your car gets impounded 

No one likes to hear that their car is in an impoundment lot. In these situations, it’s crucial to have your auto title. If you don’t, your vehicle will sit in the lot until it gets recycled, auctioned off, or taken to the wrecking yard. The only way to prevent any of these things from happening is to have proof that you own your vehicle when you pick it up. 

4. A vehicle is part of a crime after you sell it or before you own it 

It doesn’t matter if a vehicle is part of a crime after you sell it or before you own it. When the authorities come to speak with you, you want to have proof that you didn’t own the vehicle when it was part of a crime. Otherwise, you could draw unwanted attention. 

Types of auto titles

So, you know what an auto title is and why it’s important. But do you know what type of new auto title you need? 

Surprisingly, there are multiple types of auto titles. And before you try to get a new one, you need to know exactly what you’re replacing. Luckily, the list of auto titles is pretty short. 

1. An auto title for a clean vehicle

You need this type of auto title if your vehicle is in good shape structurally. This title indicates that your car has never been in a major accident, and therefore, totaled.  

2. An auto title for a clear vehicle

This title is required if there are no liens against your vehicle. If you’re not making any finance payments because you own your car, you want this type of title. 

3. An auto title for a salvage vehicle 

You need this auto title if your car was in an accident and declared a total loss. With a salvage title, the state is basically saying that you can’t drive or sell your vehicle in its current condition. 

4. An auto title for a rebuilt vehicle 

If you get your salvaged vehicle repaired, you need an auto title that’s specific to your rebuilt car. This title indicates that your vehicle is in better shape or that it may require additional repairs in the future.  

How to get a new auto title

It’s finally time to explain how to get a new auto title. When you get your first one, you either get it from a car dealer or private owner, depending on where you bought your car. 

But when you lose or damage that auto title, you can’t go back to the previous owner or car dealer. Instead, must with the DMV or a transportation agency. 

As you probably know, the DMV is slow. You could walk into their waiting room and sit for hours until an employee finally assists you. If you want to avoid that pain, you should go through a transportation agency. 

For example, Barry Risk Management can help you get a new auto title. With over 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, their team knows how to get the appropriate type of title and make sure it meets all of your state’s requirements. 

The best part is that everything is also online. Instead of walking inside an office, you can simply contact an agent over the phone. Then, a representative will help you get a new auto title all online, in the comfort of your own home. 

With transportation agencies like Barry Risk Management, getting a new auto title is simple and quick. There are no tricks, waiting rooms, or long wait times. You can get your auto title quickly so that you have proof your car is yours.  

Call Barry Risk Management at 1-888-995-TAGS(8247) to renew get your new auto title! 

How Much Does It Cost to Renew Your Vehicle Registration?

the costs to renew your vehicle registration

In 2020, most state governments provided wiggle room regarding the deadline for renewing vehicle registration. With the pandemic disrupting many everyday activities, state officials thought it’d be best to extend the deadline for several DMV services, including vehicle registration renewals. 

Most states, like New York, extended the deadline all the way to November of 2020 to accommodate people. But today, those extensions no longer exist. In New York and other states across the U.S., your vehicle registration should be renewed at this point. However, that’s not the reality for many people. 

Whether you forgot about the extended deadline or thought state officials would extend it again, you’re in a situation where you haven’t renewed your vehicle registration. And this situation can lead to consequences, which is why you should get your registration renewed as soon as possible.

The consequences of not renewing your vehicle registration

When you don’t do something on time, you face the repercussions. For example, think about turning in a school assignment late. When that happens, you get an F unless your teacher is gracious enough to extend the deadline. 

If the teacher gives you extra time, you’re in luck—you can turn in the assignment by the new deadline and still get credit. However, if you still forget—or ignore—the extended deadline and don’t turn in the assignment on time, you can bet you’re going to face the consequences. 

About 430,000 Massachusetts residents are in this type of situation. Instead of renewing their vehicle registration by the extended deadline, they let their registration lapse. And now, they are in jeopardy of getting fined every time they drive their motor vehicle. 

What’s even worse is that there are 580,000 motor vehicles in the state with an expired inspection sticker, and those vehicles belong to the 430,000 residents, who will get fined multiple times if they have more than one vehicle with expired registration. If an officer pulls them over, they’ll likely receive a $40 fine, but the residents can get a penalty from multiple officers in one day, so that number can always increase. 

The worst punishment, however, is when the fines lead to higher car insurance rates. If an insurer notices that a driver is accumulating fines, the company won’t hesitate to increase its price. 

Consequences like these are common across every state, not just Massachusetts. State officials everywhere are fining residents who haven’t renewed their vehicle registration by the extended deadline. It doesn’t matter where you live. If your registration isn’t up-to-date, you’re at risk of receiving a fine and more expensive car insurance.  

The costs to renew your vehicle registration 

how much it costs to renew your vehicle registration?

If you want to renew your registration, you may be wondering how much it costs. Luckily, this service doesn’t demand a hefty price, but it does differ from state to state. 

In New York, for example, renewing your vehicle registration can be anywhere from $26 – $71, depending on the weight of your vehicle. If your motor vehicle is 1,650 lbs. or less, the registration renewal will cost $26. If it’s 1,751 lbs. to 1,850 lbs., the registration renewal will cost $29. And if it’s 1,951 lbs. or more, the registration renewal will be anywhere between $32.50 to $71.  

In Connecticut, on the other hand, the cost is different. If you live in this state and want to renew your vehicle registration, the price is around $80 for two years. However, you also have to pay an extra $10 for the Clean Air Act fee.  

Ultimately, the price for registration renewal depends on where you live and what your state uses to determine the costs. Common factors that play a role in determining the fee include your vehicle’s fuel efficiency, age, current value, and weight. But sometimes, DMV offices and transportation agencies also look at the number of cars registered in your name and your vehicle’s horsepower to see if your fee should be higher or lower.  

Where you shouldn’t go to renew vehicle registration

Once you know the cost of renewing your vehicle registration, it’s time to do it. But where should you go? The first answer is the most obvious one: the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). 

This option is usually the go-to route because it’s so well known. However, that doesn’t mean it should be the most popular. The DMV is notoriously slow, and the pandemic makes that fact even more true. 

DMV offices across the U.S. are struggling to address the backlog they’ve accumulated because of COVID-19. When their offices re-opened during the pandemic, DMV employees walked in to find more people than usual needing their help. 

The situation has gotten so bad that some people are waiting up to six months to complete simple transitions like license renewals, driver’s tests, and out-of-state transfers. And while vehicle registration is something that you can handle online, the DMV’s website is not as user-friendly as it should be to ensure a quick, seamless process. 

Where to renew your vehicle registration

If you want to renew your vehicle registration quickly to avoid fines and higher insurance rates, you can’t depend on the DMV. Instead, you need to use a credible transportation agency like Barry Risk Management, Inc. 

With over 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, Barry Risk Management, Inc. has the skills to help you renew your vehicle registration, and everything happens online. Unlike the DMV, the online platform that Barry Risk Management, Inc. uses is simple and user-friendly to ensure you get your renewal done quickly. 

And if any questions ever arise as you’re renewing your registration, Barry Risk Management, Inc. has representatives that are ready to help. Knowledgeable and friendly, a representative can guide you from start-to-finish until your renewed registration is set up, so you don’t have to worry about tackling any confusing phases alone. 

Don’t get a fine for not renewing your vehicle registration. Call to have Barry Risk Management, Inc. at 1-888-995-TAGS(8247) to renew your registration quickly! 

How to Get Personalized License Plates Online

find out how to get personalized license plates with All State Tags

When you get a new vehicle, you probably like to personalize it. You like to pick a sleek color for the exterior, select a nice color for the interior, and choose rims or tires that give your car an extra oomph. 

Some people may not bother with all of this hassle—they may not personalize every detail of their vehicle because the design isn’t the most important thing to them. Perhaps they care more about safety. It’s equally important to have a car that can go from point A to B. 

However, if you’re someone who cares about personalizing every aspect of your vehicle, then you need more than just a safe car. You need something that’s tailored specifically to you. 

Whether it’s a car, truck, or motorcycle, custom vehicles are essential to you. They act as an extension of your identity, and they give people a glimpse into who you are and what you like. That’s why you put so much energy into personalizing your vehicle and maybe even your license plates. 

Custom license plates can say a lot about you. They can reveal your interest, hobbies, favorite sports team, alma mater, and whether or not you’re active military or a veteran. But getting these plates is not always easy, especially when you go through the DMV. That’s why you need to learn how to get personalized license plates online. 

What to know about personalized license plates

Before you learn how to get personalized license plates online, you need to know something else first: custom plates can backfire from time to time. These pitfalls usually don’t occur if your personalized plates simply include a picture next to your license plate number. 

For example, maybe you want to include your favorite team’s mascot or your college logo on your license plates. In this scenario, you’ll rarely face issues with personalizing your plates.

However, when you go beyond choosing an image and try to select the numbers and letters on your new license plates, problems can sometimes occur. It’s not uncommon to see people who’ve chosen a combination of letters and numbers for their license plates and unintentionally and surprisingly faced hurdles. 

In fact, here are just a handful of stories that illustrate what can happen when you try to personalize your new license plates. 

Learn how to get personalized license plates for your motor vehicle.

1. License plates that say NOTAG

Multiple drivers have experienced the consequences of having NOTAG on their license plates. In 2004, a man with a Suzuki motorcycle received more than 200 citations because of Delaware’s computer system. According to the Associated Press, the system linked any ticket regarding a lack of plates to the man’s personal information. 

A similar incident also happened to a woman in 2012. While living in Florida, she found herself with 145 tickets that cost more than $8,000. And it was all because her personalized license plates had NOTAG on them. 

2. License plates that say NO TAGS

In Washington DC, a man had slightly different license plates than the one in the above example. Instead of NOTAG, his license plates read NO TAGS. And, of course, this variation also led to issues. 

The man kept his license plates for nearly 30 years, and during that time, he got more than $20,000 in tickets. He told an NBC affiliate that he had to visit the courthouse every few months to get the tickets removed. 

But eventually, city officials spoke to authorities to resolve the issue. Moving forward, ticket writers had to write down “none” instead of “no tags” if they came across a vehicle without license plates. 

3. License plates that say NONE

The next example comes from Los Angeles in 1979. According to LA Times, the state allowed people to write down their top three choices for a custom license plate. 

A sportsman who loved the ocean wrote BOATING and SAILING as his top two choices. Then, in the third slot, he jotted down NO PLATE, assuming the DMV would realize he wanted a standard license plate if his top two choices didn’t work. However, the DMV never made this realization. 

The characters on his license plate read NO PLATE. And after seven months, he had 2,500 citations. The LA Times reported that the DMV had to inform the authorities to stop writing “no plate” on tickets and start saying “none.”

4. License plates that say NV

In 2004, a man in California decided to use NV on his new license plates—these characters were his initials, and for a while, things were great. He didn’t run into any issues. 

But one day, he discovered something interesting. In California, NV stands for “not visible” to traffic cops. And it wasn’t long before the man started to get tickets, which he handled one-by-one. However, when something happened with Oakland’s computer system, the man started to receive tickets across different counties, totaling more than $3,000. 

Choose your new custom license plates carefully 

The list above offers just a handful of examples to showcase how tricky it can be when you get personalized license plates. But those examples shouldn’t scare you off. 

You can still personalize your plates, regardless of whether you want an image or your own sequence of letters and numbers. Just keep in mind that if you choose the ladder, select a combination of characters wisely. You don’t want to find yourself in a situation where you’re getting tickets on a regular basis for no fault of your own. 

Your state will try to do what it can to help you out—city officials are not required to approve your request for personalized license plates. So if your state notices that your combination of letters and numbers is problematic, they will reject it. 

But states are not going to catch every potential blunder. If you want to prevent any problems, you need to make sure the letters and numbers you’re picking won’t lead to any obstacles. 

Get personalized license plates online  

Once you figure out what you’re going to put on your personalized license plates, you have two options to get it done. You can either go through the DMV. The organization allows you to come in person, mail in a form, or use their website to get personalized plates. 

Or, you can have a transportation agency like Barry Risk Management, Inc. handle everything for you. Unlike the DMV, Barry Risk Management, Inc. makes things easy. Everything is online. Their processes are convenient, simple, and easy to go through. And there are representatives that are waiting to help you if questions arise.

With over 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, Barry Risk Management, Inc. knows how to get you new personalized license plates. It doesn’t matter what state you’re in or what the rules are. If you want custom license plates, Barry Risk Management, Inc. can help you quicker than the DMV. 

For help getting new license plates that are personalized to your tastes, call 1-888-995-TAGS(8247) to speak with a representative!

What Do You Need to Register a Vehicle?

what do you need to register a vehicle? Discover the answers in our blog post.

If you want something, usually you have to give something in return.

For example, if you want to pursue a side hustle, you need to put in the effort. If you want to park at a meter, you need to give it money. And if you want good relationships, you have to spend time with the people who matter most. 

When it comes to certain things in life, sometimes you just don’t have a choice — you have to give in order to get. And the same concept applies to registering a vehicle. 

While a mundane task, you have to provide several things for vehicle registration. It doesn’t matter if it’s a motorcycle, motor home, SUV, or two-door car. If you’re riding around in something with wheels, you need to register it, and you need to provide the right information to do so correctly. 

Surprisingly, though, most people don’t know what to bring. While many consumers have at least one vehicle, they don’t know what information they need to provide to register it. In fact, even if someone has registered a car before, it’s likely they’ve already forgotten what they had to bring to do it. 

And that’s no one’s fault. Vehicle registration just isn’t top-of-mind. People don’t think about it on a regular basis, so the details can get a little blurry. 

However, that’s why this article is here for you to read. If you’re wondering what you need to register a motor vehicle, you’ve come to the right place. 

When you need to register a vehicle 

It’s important to start with the basics. 

Before you learn what you need to register a vehicle, you should know whether you need to register it at all. There are certain times where you need to apply for vehicle registration. And depending on your situation, you may not have to do it that often. 

For example, here are three specific times when you’ll need to register your motor vehicle. 

1. When you move to a new state

Moving to a new state is expected. When you graduate from college, you might decide to move. When you get a job out of state, you usually have to move. And when you retire, you may want to move somewhere that has great weather, sunshine every day of the week, and a beach. 

Research suggests that if you’re living in the U.S., you can expect to move 11.7 times in your lifetime. That’s a lot of relocating. And while it’s easy to get swept up by the adventure in it all, you don’t want to get so excited that you forget to do one crucial thing: register your vehicle. 

That’s right—every time you move to a new state, you need to register your motor vehicle. And you need to do it within a specific timeframe. Every state is different, so the timeframes will vary. But as long as you check with your state’s requirements, you should be good to go. 

2. When you buy a new or used vehicle 

Getting a car, truck, or another type of motor vehicle is always exciting. Whether it’s new or used, it’s easy to fall in love with your new whip. However, before you grab the keys and take off without a second thought, you need to register your vehicle. 

If you get a vehicle from a dealership, the company will likely handle this task for you. Most dealerships will take care of the registration, regardless of whether the vehicle is new or used. 

But if you’re getting a vehicle from someone who doesn’t work for a dealership, then you’ll need to register the vehicle on your own. 

3. When you need to renew your registration

Maybe you’ve already registered your vehicle. If that’s the case, you’ll need to do it again. However, you won’t have to do it often. 

Most states require you to renew your vehicle registration every 1-2 years. But again, every state is different. If you want information that’s specific to you and your vehicle registration, you should look up your state’s requirements. Then, you’ll know exactly when it’s time to renew your registration. 

What you need for vehicle registration

After you buy a car, you need to register it. But what do you need to register a vehicle? Find out.

 

When it’s time for you to register your vehicle, you need to approach the task prepared. Doing this requires you to know everything that you need. And luckily, the list of items is simple. 

If you need to register your vehicle, most states will require the following: 

1. Money to pay the fees

As with most things that deal with your vehicle, you need to pay a registration fee to register it. The price will differ depending on the state you live in, so make sure you do some research to determine the exact costs. 

2. The car title

Before you can register a vehicle, you need to prove that it’s actually yours. Without proof of ownership, you can’t register any motor vehicle in your name, so make sure you have the car title with you. And if you’re leasing a motor vehicle, bring a copy of the lease agreement. 

3. Proof of ID and residence

Registering a vehicle with a state requires you to prove that you indeed live in the state. Typically, your license can work. It’ll prove your identity and residence. 

However, if you just moved to a new state, your license will not work. In this case, you need to find something else to bring, like a utility bill. 

4. A bill of sale or certificate of origin

Are you the first person to own your vehicle? If so, you need to provide the certificate of origin to prove it, which you’ll get from the car dealer. 

If you’re not the first person to own your vehicle, then you need to provide something else: the bill of sale. You should get this document from the private seller who sold you the vehicle. 

5. Information about the vehicle 

Most of the general information about your vehicle will be on the title. However, in case something’s missing, you want to be prepared. 

Before registering your vehicle, make sure you jot down important information, including your vehicle’s make, model, model year, color, odometer reading, and Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). 

6. Proof of insurance

Car insurance is essential. It protects you and helps you register your vehicle with the state. When you get car insurance, make sure to provide proof of it when you’re registering your vehicle. You should also ensure that your insurance follows state requirements because these guidelines can vary depending on where you live. 

7. Emission and safety certificates

If you have a used car, some states will want proof that your vehicle meets certain criteria. These specific guidelines are usually in regards to emissions and whether your vehicle is mechanically sound.

How to register your vehicle 

Once you have everything you need to register your vehicle, all you have to do is complete the task. You can do this in one of two ways. 

You can either go to the DMV or use a credible transportation agency like Barry Risk Management, Inc.. The ladder option is the best because good transportation agencies don’t require you to go through a long, arduous process like the DMV does. 

For example, Barry Risk Management, Inc. lets you register your vehicle online. And you get access to a representative who knows your state’s requirements for vehicle registration, allowing you to skip a lengthy research process. 

The best part is that Barry Risk Management, Inc. is just as skilled as any DMV office. Their team has 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, making them an excellent choice if you want DMV services without all of the hassles. 

So, if you want to register your vehicle, use Barry Risk Management, Inc. Then, you can check this task off your to-do list quickly and easily. 

Call  1-888-995-TAGS(8247) to contact a representative with Barry Risk Management, Inc. and register or renew your vehicle registration! 

What is the Difference Between Car Title and Registration?

What is the Difference Between Car Title and Registration?

When you’re in the market for a new car, you have a lot to think about. What kind of vehicle do you want? Do you need an auto loan? Are there any reasonable car insurance rates? Should you even buy, or should you just lease?

All of these questions can easily run through your mind, and you need to have an answer for all of them. However, if you decide to buy a vehicle, you have to get a car title and registration, which could lead to another pressing question: what’s the difference between them? 

It’s easy to mistake these documents as one and the same. But honestly, a car title is entirely different from vehicle registration. You can’t get one of these documents and assume it’ll act as a representative for the other. 

You need to get both of them, which means you need to understand the differences between a car title and vehicle registration. 

What is a car title? 

Also called a Certificate of Title, a car title shows proof of ownership for various motor vehicles, including a car, truck, motorboat, motorcycle, utility trailer, travel trailer, or mobile home. 

Without a car title, you can’t prove to anyone that you legally own your motor vehicle. It’s the only piece of paper standing between you and someone else possibly thinking that you stole your car. So, it’s really important to have. 

Once you get your car title, you may notice that it includes a few details. This document will provide information on your motor vehicle like its make, model, year, and whether someone has totaled it or deemed it a complete loss after a theft or accident. 

Another critical piece of information that you’ll notice is any lienholders that you used. If you borrowed money from an auto dealer or bank to purchase your vehicle, that entity is going to be on your car title. 

How do you get a car title? 

learn the difference between a car title and vehicle registration

So, you know how important it is to have a car title, but how do you actually get one. The answer to this question depends on the situation. Specifically, here are three different scenarios in which you will need to get a car title. 

1. Buying a used vehicle 

If you’re buying a used vehicle, you’ll need the current owner to transfer the title to you. How this transfer happens will depend on how old the vehicle is. 

For example, maybe you buy a vehicle with the model year of 1973 or newer. In this situation, you need the current owner to put your name on the transfer section of the car title. Depending on the state you live in, you may have to get the title notarized and have the original owner sign a vehicle bill of sale. 

For vehicles that are ten years old or newer than the year of transfer, you’ll follow the same process. However, you may also need to get a damage disclosure statement and an odometer disclosure statement signed. 

And for vehicles from 1973 or later, all you have to do is have the owner sign the transferable registration and a bill of sale.  

2. Paying off your auto loan

When you’ve finished paying off your auto loan, it can feel like a relief. It’s one less bill that you have to pay! What’s even better is that you finally get full ownership of your vehicle, which means you get to have the car title in your possession. 

For this to happen, all you have to do is remove the lien on the car title. Transportation agencies such as Barry Risk Management, Inc. can help you with this, and their representatives will ensure the title is transferred to you once the lienholder is off. 

3. Lost, stolen, or damaged title 

Sometimes, a car title can get lost, stolen, or damaged. The best way to prevent this is to keep your car title somewhere secure (and no, your car doesn’t count). It would help if you kept it in a safe with a lock so that no one can steal or damage it.  

But if one of those things happens, you’ll need to go to a transportation agency like Barry Risk Management, Inc. to get a new car title. The process won’t take long. You’ll just have to provide some information online, and then you’ll get your new title in no time. 

What is vehicle registration? 

the biggest differences between car title and registration

The next important document that you need to get is vehicle registration. Unlike a car title, which shows proof of ownership, registration proves that you’ve registered your vehicle with the state and have paid all of the relevant fees and taxes. 

This document is essential because it allows you to drive on public roads. Without vehicle registration, your motor vehicle is not known to the state, which could lead to a fine or even jail time. So, regardless of whether you’re leasing or buying a vehicle, you need to get it registered with the state. 

When you take this action, you’ll usually get a license plate and a registration document or sticker to put on your windshield. Regardless of the one that you receive, both will provide proof that you’ve registered your vehicle. 

However, just because you’ve registered your vehicle once doesn’t mean that you don’t have to do it again. Typically, every 1-2 years, you’ll need to renew your registration. But it’s essential to check the exact time frame because every state is different. 

Additionally, if you decide to move across state lines, you’ll want to register your vehicle with your new state. Most places require you to update your registration and license plate soon after you become a resident. 

How do you register a vehicle? 

Registering your vehicle is not as straightforward as getting a car title. Because every state has its own laws, the process for registering a car can vary

However, there are some common steps in the process that you may notice. For example, you typically need to insure your vehicle before you register it. Not every state is like this, but most of them are. 

Similarly, most states require the following information for you to register your vehicle: 

  • Insurance card
  • Driver’s license
  • Car title 
  • Application for vehicle registration
  • Statement of transaction
  • Proof of payment for fees and taxes
  • The bill of sale 

Once you gather those documents, usually, your last step is to fill out a registration form. Transportation agencies like Barry Risk Management, Inc. can provide this form and any other paperwork that you need to fill out. And if your state has unique requirements for registration, Barry Risk Management, Inc. can explain those and help you navigate them so that you successfully register your vehicle with your state.  

For help on registering your vehicle or getting a car title, contact a representative with Barry Risk Management, Inc!

How Often Should You Take a Defensive Driving Course?

how often should you take a defensive driving course?

Most likely, you’ve heard the term defensive driving

Maybe you’ve seen people take a defensive driving course to get themselves out of trouble. For example, sometimes you can take this class to remove a ticket from your record. Or, perhaps, you’ve seen other people take a proactive step and go through a defensive driving course to experience all the benefits they provide. 

While both reasons are on opposite ends of a spectrum, each one allows you to unlock benefits that you normally wouldn’t receive. Even more important is that a defensive driving course equips you to anticipate and handle emergencies that happen on the road. 

However, there’s a catch to all of these benefits. If you want to continuously encounter the advantages of a defensive driving course, you may have to take the class multiple times. 

Defensive driving courses are not like most classes that you take in school. For example, don’t have to take geometry in high school and again in college (unless it’s a part of your major). But with defensive driving, you may have to take the class one year and then again in a few years. 

In New York, for instance, you must take a defensive driving course every 36 months to keep your insurance benefits. Most states have the same requirements. 

However, some states, like Texas, are slightly different. While they require you to take a defensive driving course every three years to keep your insurance benefits, you also have to take the class once every year for ticket dismissal. 

Every state will have its own rules and requirements to help you maintain the benefits you received from your first defensive driving course. But if you don’t know all of the benefits you can experience from getting a defensive driving certification, you probably won’t care to take the course multiple times or even once.  

What is defensive driving?

Getting the motivation to take a class every so often can sound difficult, which is why it’s important to have a thorough understanding of all of the benefits you could receive. So, let’s start with the basics. 

What exactly is defensive driving? 

Simply put, a defensive driving course provides safe driving tactics that you can use in emergency situations or when you’re feeling fatigued, road rage, or emotional distress. Whether you’re a great driver or not, you can’t control what’s happening around you. 

When you’re on the road, you’re going to encounter bad weather, aggressive drivers, mechanical issues, and roadway obstacles, like a tree that’s fallen and blocked off half the street. These hazards are things you want to prepare for because they can jeopardize you and your passengers’ safety. 

What are the benefits of defensive driving?

how often should you take a defensive driving course to keep your benefits?

Once you complete a defensive driving course, you can unlock a handful of benefits. Specifically, there are four specific advantages that you may enjoy. 

1. Learn how to stay accident-free

Let’s start with the more obvious benefit. It doesn’t matter if you’re driving down the block or taking a road trip across the country. You will experience road hazards along the way. 

With a defensive driving course, you can learn how to anticipate and avoid potential threats that could hurt you and your passengers’ safety. A good class will teach you how to handle careless drivers, aggressive drivers, poor visibility, and dangers that can occur because of physical or emotional states. 

2. Freshen up on driving laws

Did you know that, on average, there are 6 million car accidents in the U.S. every year? Did you know that 3 million people in the U.S. are injured every year because of accidents and that 2 million drivers experience permanent injuries? 

Unless you’re a new driver, you probably haven’t reviewed any regulations or laws that you should follow on the road. Even worse, you probably haven’t looked at the new driving laws you should know if you’ve moved to a new state. 

However, if you want to prevent car accidents and keep you and others safe, use a defensive driving course to freshen up on rules and regulations. Reminders are great for even the most seasoned drivers. 

3. Experience insurance reductions

If you love a good deal, then you should take a defensive driving course. 

Most insurance companies will voluntarily reduce your insurance premium if you complete a defensive driving class. In other states, like Pennsylvania, insurance companies are required to provide discounts to drivers who successfully finish a defensive driving course. 

Sometimes, the reduction can be as much as 10%. And this discount can be considerable savings for parents who don’t want to pay exponentially higher rates when they add their teen drivers to their insurance policy. 

4. Decrease fines and points

Another great benefit of a defensive driving course is that it can remove points or dismiss tickets on your driving record. As you likely know, when you get too many tickets, you can face fines. And sometimes, you can get your license suspended. 

These consequences are bad news if you make a living as a driver, whether it’s for a ridesharing company, mail delivery service, or retailer. However, what’s worse is that you’ll have to allocate money to buses, cabs, and other means of transportation if you can’t drive.

5. Enjoy convenience 

This benefit applies to an online experience. When it comes to taking a defensive driving course, you have the option to take it online. 

With this path, you can take the class anytime, anywhere. You can use whatever device you have available to you. You can finish the course at your own pace. And you can access your defensive driving certification whenever you want. 

How to get a defensive driving certification 

Taking a defensive driving course has clear benefits. Even if you must take it multiple times throughout your life, it’s worth it. So, your next step should be simple: take the course. 

Barry Risk Management, Inc. offers the opportunity for you to take a defensive driving class and receive your certification. However, the best part is that the class is all online. You don’t have to leave your house. 

All you have to do is find a device that works best for you and start taking the course on your own time. And if you have any questions along the way, the representatives at Barry Risk Management, Inc. has you covered. 

Start taking a defensive driving course and get your certification by contacting Barry Risk Management, Inc. today!

What Happens When You Don’t Renew Vehicle Registration?

what happens when you don't renew vehicle registration?

For every action, there’s a reaction. If you regularly drink water, you’ll stay hydrated. If you work out consistently, you’ll get in shape. And if you get enough sleep, you’ll wake up refreshed.

These basic truths are obvious. Knowing that there’s a reaction for every action is to be expected, and that’s why it should come as no surprise to learn this: if you don’t renew your vehicle registration, you’ll face penalties.  

Usually, it’s easy to remember to do the necessary things in life, like taking care of your health and wellness. But when it comes to the not-so-every-day-things, like renewing your vehicle registration, it’s a little tougher to remember to write that item on your to-do list. 

However, what happens when you don’t renew your vehicle registration? What are the specific consequences that you may face? Well, the straightforward answer is that it depends on the state you live in. Nevertheless, there are a few general penalties that you might notice no matter where you live.

The consequences of not renewing vehicle registration

Your vehicle registration must be renewed every year or every few years—the exact amount of time will vary depending on the state you call home. 

However, if you don’t know when it’s time to renew your registration, and therefore, forget to do it, you may face two things: a ticket and a fine. 

With expired vehicle registration, you open up the door for a police officer to pull you over and ticket you for a lapse in car registration. In addition, you may have to pay a fee to the state because of your mistake.

These consequences may not sound like a big deal at first. But after so many tickets and fines, you’ll start to notice how much money you could save by just renewing your registration instead of paying the penalties. 

You also may think it’s worth updating your registration if you have to face more consequences on top of all the fees. Not renewing your vehicle registration could lead to more expensive car insurance rates. And in the worst-case scenario, failing to renew your registration could mean losing your car. 

It’s not uncommon to see a vehicle get impounded because the owner forgot—or blatantly avoided—to renew their registration. In this scenario, you can’t get your vehicle back until you update your registration and pay all of your fines. Sometimes, that fine even includes the impound and towing fees. 

While these penalties may sound extreme, there is good news. Sometimes, states will offer a grace period for you to renew your vehicle registration. For example, Oklahoma, Iowa, and Colorado provide a one-month grace period after your registration expires, whereas Texas only offers a five day grace period.

It’s important to check with your state to see if a grace period is available. Hopefully, you’ll have a little wiggle room to renew your registration. But if you live in a major city, like New York City, for example, you may find that a grace period does not exist. 

Can you have expired registration during a pandemic? 

Remembering to renew your car registration during “normal” times is already difficult. Today, it’s easy to always have something going on, so registration renewal may be the last thing on your mind. And this sentiment is even more true during a pandemic. 

Because of COVID-19, many states have offered some leeway when it comes to renewing your vehicle registration. Keeping citizens healthy and safe during a pandemic is of utmost priority for many state officials. So, most local leaders don’t enforce penalties if your registration expired in 2020. 

However, does this freedom mean that it’s okay to have expired registration? The answer is simple: no. Even though most states are trying to be flexible when it comes to enforcing penalties, they do have an extended deadline for you to renew your car registration. 

For example, in New York, Governor Cuomo issued an executive order towards the end of March that extended the expiration date of vehicle registration and inspections. These registrations had to be valid as of March 27, 2020.

As time went on, Cuomo extended the order multiple times until it finally expired on November 3, 2020. However, to give people enough time to renew their registration, he signed an order that prevented police from giving tickets to drivers that had expired vehicle registration. 

Unfortunately, though, this order has expired. As of December 1, 2020, police officers can ticket you if you don’t have up-to-date registration in New York. So, even though there’s a pandemic, you still need to renew your documents. With extensions and executive orders expiring, you will start to face consequences for driving with outdated registration.

How much does it cost to renew vehicle registration? 

how much do you have to pay to renew vehicle registration

If you don’t want to face penalties for having expired registration, you need to get this taken care of sooner rather than later. However, to do that, there’s something you need to consider: the costs. 

Renewing your vehicle registration will cost money, and the renewal fees will differ depending on the state you live in. Some states are unique and require you to pay a fee based on the type of license plate that you have. 

For example, in Chicago, a standard renewal sticker costs $151. If you have a personalized plate, that cost increases slightly to $158. And if you have a vanity plate, the price for renewal goes up to $164. 

Other states look at a list of factors to determine how much you have to pay to renew your registration. In New Jersey, for instance, the cost is based on your vehicle’s model and weight

If you have a model from 1970 or older and it weighs under 2,700 lbs, you’ll have to pay $35 for registration renewal. If that model weighs between 2,700 lbs – 3,800 lbs, you’ll have to pay around $44. 

Every state is different, so it’s important to check the costs to ensure you know what you need to pay. Don’t listen to a friend or relative that lives in another state and doesn’t know your state’s laws. 

How to renew your vehicle registration

When it’s time to renew your registration, where do you go? You have two options: the DMV or a transportation agency. 

The first option is the most common one, although it does require you to wrestle with the endless hassles at the DMV. Taking this route, especially during a pandemic, means you’ll have to make an appointment for months out and wait in a long line for someone to assist you. However, it could also mean that you go on your state’s DMV website to renew your registration. But even then, the process is not so simple. 

If you want to avoid this unnecessary headache, option two is the best route to take. Transportation agencies like Barry Risk Management, Inc. can renew your registration quickly and easily—and it can all happen online. 

With over 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, Barry Risk Management, Inc. has the skill set and ability to handle your registration renewal so that you don’t get penalized. It doesn’t matter where you live. The representatives at Barry Risk Management, Inc. will ensure your registration complies with your state’s specific laws. 

For help renewing your registration, contact an agent at Barry Risk Management, Inc. today!