How to Get a New Auto Title

how to get a new auto title

When you own a car, you receive an important document. This document is an auto title, and it’s something that people typically tell you not to lose or damage. Otherwise, it could cause trouble. 

Usually, you safeguard this piece of information the best way that you can, hoping nothing happens to it. But what do you do when the worst-case scenario occurs, and you lose or damage your auto title? 

If you’ve found yourself in this predicament, it’s easy to panic and wonder what to do next. However, if you want to learn how to get a new auto title, this article will provide one easy tip that you can use. 

What is an auto title?

Before learning how to get a new auto title, it’s essential to revisit the purpose of having this document. This information might be old news to some of you, in which case this will be a good refresher. But if you’ve never learned what an auto title is, this definition will explain why it’s so critical to safeguard this document. 

Put simply, an auto title proves that you own your motor vehicle. Without it, you have no way of showing that you possess ownership of your car. 

Depending on the state you live in, the information on the auto title will vary. However, it’ll always include a vehicle identification number (VIN) and the signature of state officials who are in charge of motor vehicles or revenue collection. 

Typically, an auto title will also include the following:

  • Vehicle make
  • Vehicle model or body type
  • Vehicle year 
  • The owners of the vehicle 
  • The owner’s address
  • Odometer reading 
  • The date the title was issued 

Sometimes, your auto title may have more specific information. Yours could provide your license plate number, your vehicle’s weight, a title number, the engine number, the number of cylinders in the engine, and the type of fuel your vehicle uses. Additionally, some states require that you add information about salvage or flood damage. 

Why is a car title important? 

why is a new auto title important

You want a car title because it’ll prove that you own your vehicle—that’s the primary benefit of the document. But there are practical ways where you’ll see this benefit play out. For example, an auto title is important in the following situations.

1. Someone steals your car

If someone steals your motor vehicle, how do you prove that the thief doesn’t own your car? You refer to your auto title. Without this document, the police won’t believe that you possess ownership of your vehicle. 

2. You want to sell your car

You can’t sell your vehicle without an auto title. The buyer will ask you to transfer the title to them to prove they’re the new owners. But if you don’t have your auto title, the buyer is going to walk away

3. Your car gets impounded 

No one likes to hear that their car is in an impoundment lot. In these situations, it’s crucial to have your auto title. If you don’t, your vehicle will sit in the lot until it gets recycled, auctioned off, or taken to the wrecking yard. The only way to prevent any of these things from happening is to have proof that you own your vehicle when you pick it up. 

4. A vehicle is part of a crime after you sell it or before you own it 

It doesn’t matter if a vehicle is part of a crime after you sell it or before you own it. When the authorities come to speak with you, you want to have proof that you didn’t own the vehicle when it was part of a crime. Otherwise, you could draw unwanted attention. 

Types of auto titles

So, you know what an auto title is and why it’s important. But do you know what type of new auto title you need? 

Surprisingly, there are multiple types of auto titles. And before you try to get a new one, you need to know exactly what you’re replacing. Luckily, the list of auto titles is pretty short. 

1. An auto title for a clean vehicle

You need this type of auto title if your vehicle is in good shape structurally. This title indicates that your car has never been in a major accident, and therefore, totaled.  

2. An auto title for a clear vehicle

This title is required if there are no liens against your vehicle. If you’re not making any finance payments because you own your car, you want this type of title. 

3. An auto title for a salvage vehicle 

You need this auto title if your car was in an accident and declared a total loss. With a salvage title, the state is basically saying that you can’t drive or sell your vehicle in its current condition. 

4. An auto title for a rebuilt vehicle 

If you get your salvaged vehicle repaired, you need an auto title that’s specific to your rebuilt car. This title indicates that your vehicle is in better shape or that it may require additional repairs in the future.  

How to get a new auto title

It’s finally time to explain how to get a new auto title. When you get your first one, you either get it from a car dealer or private owner, depending on where you bought your car. 

But when you lose or damage that auto title, you can’t go back to the previous owner or car dealer. Instead, must with the DMV or a transportation agency. 

As you probably know, the DMV is slow. You could walk into their waiting room and sit for hours until an employee finally assists you. If you want to avoid that pain, you should go through a transportation agency. 

For example, Barry Risk Management can help you get a new auto title. With over 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, their team knows how to get the appropriate type of title and make sure it meets all of your state’s requirements. 

The best part is that everything is also online. Instead of walking inside an office, you can simply contact an agent over the phone. Then, a representative will help you get a new auto title all online, in the comfort of your own home. 

With transportation agencies like Barry Risk Management, getting a new auto title is simple and quick. There are no tricks, waiting rooms, or long wait times. You can get your auto title quickly so that you have proof your car is yours.  

Call Barry Risk Management at 1-888-995-TAGS(8247) to renew get your new auto title! 

What is the Difference Between Car Title and Registration?

What is the Difference Between Car Title and Registration?

When you’re in the market for a new car, you have a lot to think about. What kind of vehicle do you want? Do you need an auto loan? Are there any reasonable car insurance rates? Should you even buy, or should you just lease?

All of these questions can easily run through your mind, and you need to have an answer for all of them. However, if you decide to buy a vehicle, you have to get a car title and registration, which could lead to another pressing question: what’s the difference between them? 

It’s easy to mistake these documents as one and the same. But honestly, a car title is entirely different from vehicle registration. You can’t get one of these documents and assume it’ll act as a representative for the other. 

You need to get both of them, which means you need to understand the differences between a car title and vehicle registration. 

What is a car title? 

Also called a Certificate of Title, a car title shows proof of ownership for various motor vehicles, including a car, truck, motorboat, motorcycle, utility trailer, travel trailer, or mobile home. 

Without a car title, you can’t prove to anyone that you legally own your motor vehicle. It’s the only piece of paper standing between you and someone else possibly thinking that you stole your car. So, it’s really important to have. 

Once you get your car title, you may notice that it includes a few details. This document will provide information on your motor vehicle like its make, model, year, and whether someone has totaled it or deemed it a complete loss after a theft or accident. 

Another critical piece of information that you’ll notice is any lienholders that you used. If you borrowed money from an auto dealer or bank to purchase your vehicle, that entity is going to be on your car title. 

How do you get a car title? 

learn the difference between a car title and vehicle registration

So, you know how important it is to have a car title, but how do you actually get one. The answer to this question depends on the situation. Specifically, here are three different scenarios in which you will need to get a car title. 

1. Buying a used vehicle 

If you’re buying a used vehicle, you’ll need the current owner to transfer the title to you. How this transfer happens will depend on how old the vehicle is. 

For example, maybe you buy a vehicle with the model year of 1973 or newer. In this situation, you need the current owner to put your name on the transfer section of the car title. Depending on the state you live in, you may have to get the title notarized and have the original owner sign a vehicle bill of sale. 

For vehicles that are ten years old or newer than the year of transfer, you’ll follow the same process. However, you may also need to get a damage disclosure statement and an odometer disclosure statement signed. 

And for vehicles from 1973 or later, all you have to do is have the owner sign the transferable registration and a bill of sale.  

2. Paying off your auto loan

When you’ve finished paying off your auto loan, it can feel like a relief. It’s one less bill that you have to pay! What’s even better is that you finally get full ownership of your vehicle, which means you get to have the car title in your possession. 

For this to happen, all you have to do is remove the lien on the car title. Transportation agencies such as Barry Risk Management, Inc. can help you with this, and their representatives will ensure the title is transferred to you once the lienholder is off. 

3. Lost, stolen, or damaged title 

Sometimes, a car title can get lost, stolen, or damaged. The best way to prevent this is to keep your car title somewhere secure (and no, your car doesn’t count). It would help if you kept it in a safe with a lock so that no one can steal or damage it.  

But if one of those things happens, you’ll need to go to a transportation agency like Barry Risk Management, Inc. to get a new car title. The process won’t take long. You’ll just have to provide some information online, and then you’ll get your new title in no time. 

What is vehicle registration? 

the biggest differences between car title and registration

The next important document that you need to get is vehicle registration. Unlike a car title, which shows proof of ownership, registration proves that you’ve registered your vehicle with the state and have paid all of the relevant fees and taxes. 

This document is essential because it allows you to drive on public roads. Without vehicle registration, your motor vehicle is not known to the state, which could lead to a fine or even jail time. So, regardless of whether you’re leasing or buying a vehicle, you need to get it registered with the state. 

When you take this action, you’ll usually get a license plate and a registration document or sticker to put on your windshield. Regardless of the one that you receive, both will provide proof that you’ve registered your vehicle. 

However, just because you’ve registered your vehicle once doesn’t mean that you don’t have to do it again. Typically, every 1-2 years, you’ll need to renew your registration. But it’s essential to check the exact time frame because every state is different. 

Additionally, if you decide to move across state lines, you’ll want to register your vehicle with your new state. Most places require you to update your registration and license plate soon after you become a resident. 

How do you register a vehicle? 

Registering your vehicle is not as straightforward as getting a car title. Because every state has its own laws, the process for registering a car can vary

However, there are some common steps in the process that you may notice. For example, you typically need to insure your vehicle before you register it. Not every state is like this, but most of them are. 

Similarly, most states require the following information for you to register your vehicle: 

  • Insurance card
  • Driver’s license
  • Car title 
  • Application for vehicle registration
  • Statement of transaction
  • Proof of payment for fees and taxes
  • The bill of sale 

Once you gather those documents, usually, your last step is to fill out a registration form. Transportation agencies like Barry Risk Management, Inc. can provide this form and any other paperwork that you need to fill out. And if your state has unique requirements for registration, Barry Risk Management, Inc. can explain those and help you navigate them so that you successfully register your vehicle with your state.  

For help on registering your vehicle or getting a car title, contact a representative with Barry Risk Management, Inc!

How to Remove a Lien on a Car Title

how to remove a lien on a car title if you want sell your vehicle

Selling your car doesn’t immediately sound like a difficult process. If you’ve never done it before, you may assume that you only have to find an interested buyer, get the money from them, and hand them the title and keys to your car. Sounds easy enough, right? 

Luckily, if you’ve paid off the loan for your motor vehicle, this process is, in fact, that easy. However, if you’re still making payments, there will be a lien on your car title that you need to remove before you can ever sell your vehicle. 

Research suggests that a record 107 million Americans have auto loan debt. This number is about 43% of the entire adult U.S. population, which is a drastic increase from what experts saw in 2012. 

During that time, only 80 million Americans were making car payments. But today, you can probably find multiple relatives, friends, coworkers, or even strangers with an auto loan. 

Having this type of financial support isn’t necessarily a bad thing. In fact, a car loan may be the very reason you have your vehicle today—but it does become an issue when you want to sell your car. When that situation arises, you must remove the lien on your car title before you can take any further steps. 

What is a lien on a car title? 

Simply put, a lien protects creditors. It provides them with legal claims against pieces of property to ensure they collect the money they’re owed. 

For example, maybe you had to finance your vehicle through a bank or auto dealer. In those cases, you’d consider them as your creditors. And when you apply for a car title, you’d have to be transparent about who your lender is.

Once you apply, the lien will go and remain on your title until you finish paying your debt. Only then will your lender help remove the lien so that you can sell your vehicle. 

Who holds a lien on your vehicle? 

you must know who holds the lien on a car title if you want to remove the lien on the car title.

There are instances where your lienholder may not be an auto loan lender. For example, some states allow mechanics to put a lien on your car title if you haven’t paid them within a certain amount of time. However, more often than not, your auto loan lender will be the only one to hold the lien on your car. 

Depending on where you live, the lender will file the lien with your state’s Department of Motor Vehicles. And after you’ve paid off your debt, the lender will send another document to the DMV to release the lien so that the car title can be updated and transferred to you. 

This method is a simple process. The only thing you have to do is keep up with your car payments. Then, you can pay off your loan and have the freedom to sell your vehicle whenever you want. 

The only time you’ll experience obstacles is when you aren’t paying your creditor. There are about 6 million Americans who are 90 days or more behind on their car payments. When you’re in this situation, it becomes very challenging to sell your vehicle because you’ve not only failed to pay off your loan, but you’ve also fallen behind. 

This mishap can even lead to consequences since you’re not the legal owner of your vehicle. For example, your auto lender could repossess your car if you default on the loan. And then it’ll be impossible to sell your car. 

Can a buyer pay your auto loan to remove a lien? 

If you’re unable to pay your auto loan, you may still have an opportunity to sell your car. You just might have to rely on your potential buyer. 

Sometimes, a buyer can write a check out to your lienholder to pay the loan’s remaining balance. However, you’ll need to get your creditor’s approval to take this route. 

Make sure you call your lienholder for permission. If they agree to the terms, you can sell your vehicle, and the car title will be transferred to the new buyer. 

What happens after you pay your debt? 

While paying off your debt is the first step you must take to remove a lien on a car title, it’s not the last. If you want to finish removing a lien, you need to get help from a transportation organization. 

Typically, people like to visit their local DMV office to finish this process. The DMV will have the necessary forms you need to fill out. And it’s also the place where you can take any letter from your lender indicating the lien’s release. 

However, the DMV is also the place where you have to suffer through long lines, boring waiting rooms, sometimes grumpy employees, and unhappy customers. What’s worse is that the pandemic has made the DMV even slower and more stressful than usual.

These days, it’s hard to book an appointment. The lines are out the door, and the DMV’s calendar is full for months on end. Right now, especially, the DMV isn’t a place that you want to visit for help. The organization has a backlog that would make anyone want to scream.

But if you’ve paid off your loan and want to remove the lien on your car title, who can you go to for assistance? 

Who to use to remove a lien on a car title

When you need help removing a lien on your car title, you don’t have to go to the DMV. You have other options, and one of those options is Barry Risk Management, Inc.. 

With over 30 years of experience in the DMV industry, Barry Risk Management, Inc. can help remove an auto lien quickly and without any hassle. And the best part is that Barry Risk Management, Inc. can do it all online. 

You don’t have to leave your home. You don’t have to stand in a long line. And you don’t have to sit in a boring waiting room. 

All you have to do is get in touch with a representative from Barry Risk Management, Inc., and the agent will complete everything digitally. If they need you to fill out a document or submit any information, you can complete the task online. 

Barry Risk Management, Inc. makes things easy and simple. So, if you’ve finished paying off your auto loan and want to continue removing the lien on your car title, contact Barry Risk Management, Inc. for help. They’ll make sure you have everything you need to sell your vehicle in no time. 

Reach out here to speak with a representative with Barry Risk Management, Inc. so that you can remove the lien on your car title!  

The Simple Way to Get a New Car Title

new car title

When you get a new car, what’s the first thing that you think about? The sleek, clean look of it as you drive off the car dealership’s parking lot? The fresh smell of its leather, reminding you that you’re the first person to sit in its driver’s seat? Or the trip that you’ll have to take to the DMV to get a new car title? 

Most likely, the DMV is the last thing on your mind. 

As you’re figuring out the new features in your car and syncing your Bluetooth to your vehicle, you’re too excited to think about the DMV, and rightfully so. A new car is something you should get excited about. The DMV, on the other hand, is a source of dread. 

Still, when you get a new car, you’ll need to get a new car title. If you go to the DMV, you’ll have to carve out a few hours for the time-consuming process, wait in long lines that never seem to end, sit next to people who look miserable and defeated, and make repeat trips to experience the pain all over again. What’s worse is that the process for getting a duplicate car title is just as difficult. 

Regardless of the type of car title you need, you might develop a headache if you try to get it from the DMV. However, there is an easier way to get a duplicate or new car title, and it doesn’t require the DMV at all. But before you learn about that solution, you need to know everything there is to know about car titles. 

this car needs a new car title

What is a car title?

A car title is formerly known as a Certificate of Title. It’s the official proof of ownership for a truck, car, motorcycle, travel or utility trailer, motorboat, or mobile home. Your car title is the only thing that proves you own your vehicle. 

However, your car title also lists any lienholders that you used. For example, if you borrowed money from someone to buy your vehicle or mobile home, that person would be considered a lien and be on your title. 

If you ever decide to sell your vehicle or mobile home, you will have to transfer your ownership to the buyer using your car title. And if you lose this document, you will need to get a new car title before you can transfer ownership.

Keeping your car title safe is of utmost importance. It will help if you put it somewhere secure and reliable, so you can ensure you never lose or destroy it. Please don’t carry your car title with you or put it in your vehicle. Those are quick ways to misplace or damage it.

Instead, keep your car title in your home, and put it somewhere that you’ll remember. The last thing you want to do is hide your car title from yourself and go to the DMV because you need a duplicate one.

What’s the difference between registration and a car title?

Registration and a car title are both necessary. However, while they’re equally important, they’re also very different. 

A car title proves that you own a car, mobile home, motorboat, motorcycle, or truck. Registration, on the other hand, gives you the right to operate a motor vehicle or a motorboat. 

Mobile homes are the only things that don’t require registration. What’s also important to remember is that your registration needs to remain in your car at all times. 

If you get pulled over, the police officer will ask for your insurance and registration, not your car title. So, you need to keep your registration in your glove department or somewhere else in your car to avoid an additional ticket. 

How do you typically get a new car title?

As you know, anything that involves the DMV can become time-consuming. And getting a new car title is no different. When you need a new car title, you will automatically apply for it when you register your vehicle or motorboat. 

The DMV provides the application online for you to download, but you can also request it by contacting the DMV Call Center. Regardless of the route you choose, once you get the form, you will have to pay a fee for the car title and the costs associated with the registration, license plates, and sales tax. 

The DMV will provide your car title once it accepts your application. However, the method the DMV uses to provide your car title will depend on where you live. For example, in New York, the DMV doesn’t offer your car title over the counter. State law requires the DMV in New York to provide your title by mail only after it vigorously analyzes and verifies the proof of ownership that you submitted with your application.

If your proof of ownership doesn’t hold up or you provide the wrong documents, the DMV will contact you to resolve the issue and have you resubmit what the organization needs. Then, the application process will start over, spearheaded by the DMV’s rigorous and lengthy examination. 

Consequently, getting a new car title can take several weeks. What’s worse is if the information on the car title is wrong. When that happens, you have to contact the DMV Call center, which will likely require you to wait for about twenty minutes to speak with an associate. Then, once you finally talk to someone, you’ll have to explain the mistakes on your new car title, ask for an amended car title, and wait a few more weeks to get it. 

How to get a replacement title if the original is lost or stolen

Getting a duplicate car title through the DMV is just as time-consuming as getting one when you have a new car. 

After filling out the application for a duplicate title, you will have to pay a fee for the DMV to process and provide the document. In most states, you can get the application online.

But if that option is unavailable to you, you’ll need to call the DMV Contact Center to request for someone to mail you the application. If you don’t want to do that, you can visit a DMV office, wait in line for an hour or two, and ask for the application once an employee calls your number. 

Either way, make sure you provide the correct documents during the application process, or you will delay things even further. Most states will ask you to present some form of identification like your driver’s license. And you will typically need to provide the vehicle’s documentation, such as its registration.

However, every state is different. If you use the DMV to get a duplicate car title, make sure you know what your DMV needs. 

Simplifying the title application process

Applying for a duplicate or new car title shouldn’t be so hard. And it’s not when you avoid the DMV. 

Companies like Barry Risk Management, Inc., for example, offer the same services as the DMV but simplifies them. If you want a duplicate or new car title, you don’t have to get the application by waiting in long lines at the DMV, calling the DMV Contact Center, or searching the DMV’s website for the right form.

A representative from Barry Risk Management, Inc. can provide everything that you need. And what’s even better is that the representative will help you handle everything from the comfort of your own home. All you need to do is sit back and let the representative guide you. Then, you’ll receive your car title shortly after. 

There are no long wait times. No long lines. No lengthy phone calls. And no resubmissions or errors.

You can get a duplicate or new car title quickly with Barry Risk Management, Inc. and avoid the DMV altogether. 

Do you need a new or duplicate car title but don’t want to go to the DMV? Experience a fast, efficient, and simple process by contacting Barry Risk Management, Inc!